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WRITER: Brenda J. Linert

Discourse, debate needed to inform voters

Ohioans overwhelmingly want candidates for the state’s top political posts to face off in one-on-one debates. I’m one of them. A recent USA TODAY Network Ohio / Suffolk University poll determined about 84 percent of likely Ohio voters said candidates for Ohio governor and U.S. Senate should debate one other. Only 10 percent said these candidates should not debate, according to the new poll, which has a ...

Just one more reason not to drive drunk

By a 5-2 decision, the Ohio Supreme Court this week ruled against an Ohio man and ordered the forfeiture of his $31,000 pickup truck after his third drunken driving conviction. James O’Malley of Medina County had fought to keep his 2014 Chevrolet Silverado after a Medina County Municipal Court judge found him guilty of an OVI charge on the Fourth of July, 2018. It was O’Malley’s third OVI in 10 years. ...

Just one more reason not to drive drunk

By a 5-2 decision, the Ohio Supreme Court this week ruled against an Ohio man and ordered the forfeiture of his $31,000 pickup truck after his third drunken driving conviction. James O’Malley of Medina County had fought to keep his 2014 Chevrolet Silverado after a Medina County Municipal Court judge found him guilty of an OVI charge on the Fourth of July, 2018. It was O’Malley’s third OVI in 10 years. ...

Gavel rampage, lack of decorum get national spotlight

We chalked up one more national black eye last week, this one thanks to our increasingly infamous Trumbull County commissioners. In a light-hearted story I normally would describe as a “fun read” about out-of-control gaveling at public meetings, The Wall Street Journal (yes, that’s correct) last week carried the story “Unruly Times Spark Ruckus of Gaveling.” The story weaved through examples of ...

Sam Hunt doesn’t disappoint soggy fans in Canfield

CANFIELD — Soggy fairgoers waited out massive storms that delayed the country music concert at the Canfield Fair on Sunday but ultimately filled the grandstand for the show that promoters, stage crews and fair workers somehow managed to pull off, despite downpours that dumped nearly 4 inches of rain in the hours leading up to the show. Lines of fans, many adorned in ponchos and huddled under umbrellas, ...

New way to follow local HS, college football

The sun will set tonight at 7:52 p.m. Last Tuesday, in fact, was the last time the sun will set after 8 p.m. until sometime next spring. Many of us are starting to sleep with the windows open at night, and I recently began donning a hoodie for my nightly walks with my beagle, Max. Pumpkin spice lattes are available. Gone are the days of strawberry picking photos on these news pages. In fact, it’s only ...

We’ll keep swinging at the curveballs

In my newsroom, we take whatever pitch is thrown at us each day and we swing at it. Whether we connect with a bunt single or a home run, it’s always our goal to report accurately and balanced. Unfortunately, in the starkly divided society in which we now live, our readers — and even our sources — don’t always see it that way. As a result, we often are thrown curve- balls. I suspect politicians do that ...

Difficulty that comes with ‘selling memories’

My husband, the self-proclaimed minimalist, is a pro at finding things in the shed or the basement or the garage or even my home’s mud room closet to toss out. Problem is, those things usually belong to me or our kids — but rarely to him. When I suggested earlier this spring that we should have a garage sale, he was highly supportive. After all, it was like his dream opportunity to de-clutter — and maybe ...

Don’t believe everything on social media

Been dizzy lately? Some naysayers and social media surfers might argue there’s good reason for that. You see, the Earth is spinning faster, and the days are getting shorter. Multiple reports from reputable media outlets quoting legitimate news sources indicate that, indeed, the Earth is spinning faster. On June 29, in fact, the Earth recorded its shortest day ever — a full 1.59 millisecond less than ...

Newspapering as I can only imagine

With the assistance of a clattering contraption rarely still found, a small-town Colorado newspaper, the Saguache Crescent, produces its weekly publication for its handful of readers. The newspaper has been in business since 1867, but has been using its current method of typesetting — the Linotype — since 1921. That’s when the machine and also its current printing press was purchased by the Coombs ...