facebooktwitterRSS
- Advertisement -
  • Most Commentedmost commented up
  • Most Emailedmost emailed up
  • Popularmost popular up

Poland


Residential
3 bedroom, 5 bath
$179900


Canfield


Residential
3 bedroom, 4 bath
$325000


- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -
 

« Reason

CVS layout suggests weak City design standards

By Tyler S. Clark (Contact)


Published July 21, 2009

If the approved layout for the new CVS convenience store to be built next to Stambaugh Auditorium on Fifth Avenue is any indication, the City of Youngstown has weak design standards to begin with and either too little power to enforce appropriate design or too much desperation in approving any kind of development.

Plan for CVS on Fifth Avenue 

The layout is simply inappropriate for an urban environment, particularly one with such a richly historic setting as the North Side's Wick Park neighborhood. The store is set back, separated from the street by its parking lot and a "Landscape Area Per Youngstown Regulations." I'm anxious to find out what these regulations are and whether they will amount to more than the three trees depicted in the sketch.

The store should front directly on Fifth Avenue and the West Bound Service Road, ensuring the parking is visually obscured behind it and a more walker-friendly setting is created.

Park Avenue is to be converted to a two-way street. Will it revert to one-way on nights with Stambaugh events? That traffic is already a strain, and the (admittedly unsecured) parking that exists currently on the northwest corner of that lot will be removed. Just today I noticed the medical building on the southwest corner has been demolished.

In addition to questions of footprint, however, the more questionable result of all this is the choice of elevation, which is labeled "Desert Bluff." I had enough desert elevations in Tucson and came back here for the history. Unfortunately, the desert followed me and is now immediately adjacent to Stambaugh.

CVS elevations for new Fifth Avenue store

 

We should not be so desperate for development that we approve whatever is sent our way. We must develop design standards that represent the best of what we still have, and we must ensure they are adhered to. If a developer threatens to walk away if their cheaper design doesn't get approved, we should let them. It's a desirable enough location for both urban residents and University students, that another pharmacy would have come and bid for it if CVS ended up passing.

If we keep accepting crap, that's all we'll have. 

 


Comments

1leaveusalone(103 comments)posted 5 years ago

You know, not everyone on the north side thinks like you do. Many of us, who moved here (long before you did) to live in peace and inexpensive comfort, are thrilled to see the CVS coming (and Walmart). As for the design of the building - again, many of us have no problems with it. In fact, some of us consider Stambaugh Auditorium to be an ugly, gray, dingy looking old hulk. Frankly, the CVS will be a welcome sight. Now, if we could just get a Sheetz gas station in the general area - (maybe by St. E's on Belmont?) life would be close to perfect.

Suggest removal:

2city_resident(509 comments)posted 5 years ago

This may be rude on my part, but the previous poster's comment made me laugh out loud. If that kind of development is what you want, there are more than enough places that can provide it without ruining the stateliness of a historic, architecturally rich neighborhood.

I believe we have become too desperate for any development, and it has made us short-sighted. We tear down our historic (irreplacable) architecture because we think that the "blight" is hindering new development. If this is the kind of development we're trying to attract, I think I would prefer the "blight."

Suggest removal:

3Erplane(475 comments)posted 5 years ago

I think the 'boxification' of America is sad. CVS has plenty of experience in dealing with towns that have high demands to have aesthetically-pleasing designs, but will of course go with the cheapest alternative if nobody presses them. Even putting a slanted roof on the design and using a warmer brick color will be immensely valuable. And your right...parking lots should be in the back.

Fight it.

Suggest removal:

4city_resident(509 comments)posted 5 years ago

Erplane, the original design presented to the design board was the more typical brick red and cream colored scheme. But, they were asked to choose a color that was more sympathetic to the stone of Stambaugh Auditorium.

Foxtrot, no one wants the city to set their standards too high. But some standards - especially in such a high profile location - would be nice.

Suggest removal:

5ksem(23 comments)posted 5 years ago

"In fact, some of us consider Stambaugh Auditorium to be an ugly, gray, dingy looking old hulk."

Wow, you are right. It is indeed a hideous piece of architecture. And to think, some of us consider Stambaugh to be a historic gem.

http://www.stambaughauditorium.com/ch...

http://www.stambaughauditorium.com/au...

http://www.stambaughauditorium.com/hi...

Visited the gardens recently and they are b-e-a-utiful!

Suggest removal:

6jcrews(7 comments)posted 5 years ago

I gasped when I read leaveusalone's description of the beautiful and stately Stambaugh Auditorium. I love 5th Avenue and Youngstown for the incredible old homes and history.

One of the reasons I love visiting Hilton Head Island is the architectural standards - strictly enforced - that require all construction to blend into the nature and beauty of the island. CVS has a remarkable opportunity here to break out of their modern non-descript architecture and blend into the beauty and history that is 5th Avenue and Youngstown.

Suggest removal:

7epicfail(217 comments)posted 5 years ago

Cheers to clarkkent. Well said!

Suggest removal:

8valleypoboy(74 comments)posted 5 years ago

That's right - if you can't come down to the level of the posted messages here, you need to leave. How dare you speak up for something better and some standards.
Poland fought with Walgreens and got a much better result. As has been said, if you're content with crap, that is exactly what you will get - now and always.

Suggest removal:

9MikePrelee(38 comments)posted 4 years, 12 months ago

I've lived in Brookfield and when it was time to give up the trailer and buy a house, I moved to a place with zoning. How can your property values hold up when Dollar General throws up pre-fab steel buildings or someone plunks an automated car wash down next to your house? You've got to have standards if you want your community to be a decent place to live. Tyler's comments are right on the money. I'm pleased CVS sees opportunity in Youngstown and is willing to develop but this design could be better. A building utilizing warmer colors, masonry and rear parking would help the neighborhood. The proposed building just looks out of place. Youngstown doesn't have to be desperate just because its hard up.

Suggest removal:

10Erplane(475 comments)posted 4 years, 12 months ago

Zoning is important to maintain resale values for both commercial and residential values. If you do not have zoning, an area can quickly become desolate based on one establish coming in. CVS is going into the area because they know they will fill a void. Its in their long term best interest to maintain the integrity of the area, which would keep property values from declining, which would mean more tennants/owners that have greater amounts of disposable and discretionary income to spend at their store.

Suggest removal:

11WilliamP(68 comments)posted 4 years, 12 months ago

Once again the City proves its short term vision. (And please save the 2010 talk; 2010 is, at best, a poorly articulated and completely undeveloped IDEA and PR piece, not a PLAN.) The entire "plan" is a book of maps that makes tangential allusions to smart shrinkage.
Also, if you want to see a REALLY ridiculous design drive down Michigan Avenue from Park Ave and look at the apt buildings allowed to be built on the right hand side. Who allowed that? They ought to be fired or removed. I lived on Michigan while at YSU and would have much preferred the vacant lot that sat there than that new ugliness. The City government works for the people. Make your voices heard and take it to the Mayor, who ultimately controls these decisions via departmental appointments and their employees.

Suggest removal:

12city_resident(509 comments)posted 4 years, 12 months ago

"No one is going to be willing to invest what it would cost to replicate the structures originally built in that area."

I don't see anyone asking for that. I'm certainly not. I don't see why it would be prohibitively expensive to have the building closer to the road with parking behind. It might also be nice to NOT have the garbage dumpster adjacant to one of this city's landmarks.

Suggest removal:



News
Opinion
Entertainment
Sports
Marketplace
Classifieds
Records
Discussions
Community
Help
Forms
Neighbors

HomeTerms of UsePrivacy StatementAdvertiseStaff DirectoryHelp
© 2014 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator.
107 Vindicator Square. Youngstown, OH 44503

Phone Main: 330.747.1471 • Interactive Advertising: 330.740.2955 • Classified Advertising: 330.746.6565
Sponsored Links: Vindy Wheels | Vindy Jobs | Vindy Homes | Pittsburgh International Airport