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« Latest photos / 2008 / November / 21

Photos on November 21, 2008

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Phantoms vs USA Nationals Nov. 21, 2008

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Phantoms vs USA Nationals Nov. 21, 2008

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Phantoms vs USA Nationals Nov. 21, 2008

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Phantoms vs USA Nationals Nov. 21, 2008

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Phantoms vs USA Nationals Nov. 21, 2008

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Phantoms vs USA Nationals Nov. 21, 2008

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Michael Bushara, a gay, white male from Youngstown, discusses possible reasons for his lowered T-cell count with a doctor at an HIV/AIDS clinic. In the foreground is a model of dark blue HIV viruses replicating within a healthy human T-cell.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Michael Bushara, a gay, white male from Youngstown, discusses possible reasons for his lowered T-cell count with a doctor at an HIV/AIDS clinic. In the foreground is a model of dark blue HIV viruses replicating within a healthy human T-cell.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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A nurse at an HIV/AIDS clinic takes weekly blood samples from Michael Bushara, a gay, white male in Youngstown. Medical check-ups and the pill regiment divide the day, Michael said.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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A nurse at an HIV/AIDS clinic takes weekly blood samples from Michael Bushara, a gay, white male in Youngstown. Medical check-ups and the pill regiment divide the day, Michael said.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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A nurse at an HIV/AIDS clinic takes weekly blood samples from Michael Bushara, a gay, white male in Youngstown. Medical check-ups and the pill regiment divide the day, Michael said.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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A nurse at an HIV/AIDS clinic takes weekly blood samples from Michael Bushara, a gay, white male in Youngstown. Medical check-ups and the pill regiment divide the day, Michael said.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Michael Bushara, a gay, white male from Youngstown, discusses possible reasons for his lowered T-cell count with a doctor at an HIV/AIDS clinic. In the foreground is a model of dark blue HIV viruses replicating within a healthy human T-cell.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Michael Bushara, a gay, white male from Youngstown, discusses possible reasons for his lowered T-cell count with a doctor at an HIV/AIDS clinic. In the foreground is a model of dark blue HIV viruses replicating within a healthy human T-cell.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Local Hospital officials estimate the number of men, women and children infected with HIV in the Youngstown area to be around 200. Olga Irwin, above, in front the neon sign that hangs in a Chinese restaurant on Market Street, is one of them.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Denise, a 44-year-old black woman poses near a window in her Warren home. Denise contracted HIV from her husband, who died of the disease. HIV/AIDS stigma affected her from the inside, out, she said. For ten years she did not seek treatment and battled immobilizing anxiety and long bouts of depression. Her dogmatic view of HIV as a "death sentence" supported her misguided belief that her doctors had given her the wrong diagnosis. It wasn't until after a near-death sickness and multiple hospitalizations and recoveries did she gain the confidence needed to work again. "Ten years of my life was caught up in the 'what-if.' Oh, If I could have that back, there's so much I would have done," Denise said. She is currently contemplating a career in public relations for HIV/AIDS non-profits.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Bill Bogan, a gay, Caucasian male, and outspoken advocate of AIDS/HIV awareness, stands near the high white fence that separates his yard from his neighbors in Struthers. Since he was diagnosed with HIV in the mid-nineties, Bill said he has come face to face with the stigma attached to the disease continually. First, when he was fired after his employer found out what his prescriptions were for and, most recently, while working in his backyard. Bill said he heard his neighbors discuss how their property values will sink as a result of his status. "If I move, they were saying, my house would have to be burned down," Bill said.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Bill Bogan, a gay, Caucasian male, and outspoken advocate of AIDS/HIV awareness, stands near the high white fence that separates his yard from his neighbors in Struthers. Since he was diagnosed with HIV in the mid-nineties, Bill said he has come face to face with the stigma attached to the disease continually. First, when he was fired after his employer found out what his prescriptions were for and, most recently, while working in his backyard. Bill said he heard his neighbors discuss how their property values will sink as a result of his status. "If I move, they were saying, my house would have to be burned down," Bill said.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Georgia poses in the game room of a house sponsored by the Ursuline Sisters AIDS Ministry for children infected or affected by HIV/AIDS. The house offers meals, counseling and academic help to Georgia and 25 other kids who have the disease or live with someone who does. She has been visiting several times a week basis since age 6, when her mother was diagnosed with HIV, and is comfortable enough to arrive in her pajamas. Though the feeling of isolation attached to caring for a family member with HIV solidified for Georgia and her older brother almost a decade ago, she has still only one friend outside of the house who knows her mom is infected. Daily worry about her mother dying coupled with the fear of being mocked by other kids has closed her off, she said. "They don't know what its like. The girls and make fun you for the stupidest things," Georgia said. "I'm used to being quiet at school. When I'm here [at the house], I can express myself."

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Georgia poses in the game room of a house sponsored by the Ursuline Sisters AIDS Ministry for children infected or affected by HIV/AIDS. The house offers meals, counseling and academic help to Georgia and 25 other kids who have the disease or live with someone who does. She has been visiting several times a week basis since age 6, when her mother was diagnosed with HIV, and is comfortable enough to arrive in her pajamas. Though the feeling of isolation attached to caring for a family member with HIV solidified for Georgia and her older brother almost a decade ago, she has still only one friend outside of the house who knows her mom is infected. Daily worry about her mother dying coupled with the fear of being mocked by other kids has closed her off, she said. "They don't know what its like. The girls and make fun you for the stupidest things," Georgia said. "I'm used to being quiet at school. When I'm here [at the house], I can express myself."

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Wilbur, a straight, black male with HIV in Youngstown, reclines in his living room. His face is covered with a Halloween mask to hide his identity. Although he said he hasn't experienced much discrimination, he is careful about disclosing. "Years ago, a friend of our family had cancer. When we went over there, we were told to cover the toilet seat. That's how HIV is perceived now," he said.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Wilbur, a straight, black male with HIV in Youngstown, reclines in his living room. His face is covered with a Halloween mask to hide his identity. Although he said he hasn't experienced much discrimination, he is careful about disclosing. "Years ago, a friend of our family had cancer. When we went over there, we were told to cover the toilet seat. That's how HIV is perceived now," he said.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Olga Irwin, a straight, white female in Youngstown spent three years after her diagnosis in denial. Olga told people she had leukemia, lupus, hereditary blood disease and cancer -- anything to explain her doctor's visits and pill bottles. It's been years since she opened up about contracting HIV from a promiscuous boyfriend but much of her family still keeps their distance. Her sister will not let her swim in the pool with her niece and nephew, she said. The fatigue and weight gain caused by HIV medications took a toll on Olga's self-esteem. She continues to experience waves of fear that she is prematurely dying. In response, she said she dyes her hair, flirts with younger men at bars, and overspends on concert tickets. Soap operas and a house full of animals help her combat those negative feelings, she said. Olga is currently pursuing a degree in social work from Youngstown State University. "You feel like everyone can see it (HIV) inside of you. I want to help other people cope with that," she said.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Olga Irwin, a straight, white female in Youngstown spent three years after her diagnosis in denial. Olga told people she had leukemia, lupus, hereditary blood disease and cancer -- anything to explain her doctor's visits and pill bottles. It's been years since she opened up about contracting HIV from a promiscuous boyfriend but much of her family still keeps their distance. Her sister will not let her swim in the pool with her niece and nephew, she said. The fatigue and weight gain caused by HIV medications took a toll on Olga's self-esteem. She continues to experience waves of fear that she is prematurely dying. In response, she said she dyes her hair, flirts with younger men at bars, and overspends on concert tickets. Soap operas and a house full of animals help her combat those negative feelings, she said. Olga is currently pursuing a degree in social work from Youngstown State University. "You feel like everyone can see it (HIV) inside of you. I want to help other people cope with that," she said.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Olga Irwin, a straight, white female in Youngstown spent three years after her diagnosis in denial. Olga told people she had leukemia, lupus, hereditary blood disease and cancer -- anything to explain her doctor's visits and pill bottles. It's been years since she opened up about contracting HIV from a promiscuous boyfriend but much of her family still keeps their distance. Her sister will not let her swim in the pool with her niece and nephew, she said. The fatigue and weight gain caused by HIV medications took a toll on Olga's self-esteem. She continues to experience waves of fear that she is prematurely dying. In response, she said she dyes her hair, flirts with younger men at bars, and overspends on concert tickets. Soap operas and a house full of animals help her combat those negative feelings, she said. Olga is currently pursuing a degree in social work from Youngstown State University. "You feel like everyone can see it (HIV) inside of you. I want to help other people cope with that," she said.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Danny Feliciano, a Hispanic male, poses in the library of National College on the North side of Youngstown where attends classes hoping to become an IT specialist. Danny was diagnosed HIV+ in 1993. Approaching his 16th medicated year, his advice to others with the disease is to "keep walking through life as though you don't have it." "...People will always be looking over your shoulder...trying to get in your business and say something, you know me, you got to keep your chin up and take it one day at a time," he said. For advice on coping with HIV, email him at felicianod25@natlcollege.edu.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Christian Edward Owens, a gay, white HIV+ male from Warren blocks his face with a box of Wheat Thins on his way out of a Giant Eagle Supermarket. Chris said he has moved all over the country because disclosing his status continually leaves him ostracized wherever he is living. "People don't know how big the HIV population is. If you look around the grocery there's someone with HIV. We eat food...we're just like you," he said.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Christian Edward Owens, a gay, white HIV+ male from Warren blocks his face with a box of Wheat Thins on his way out of a Giant Eagle Supermarket. Chris said he has moved all over the country because disclosing his status continually leaves him ostracized wherever he is living. "People don't know how big the HIV population is. If you look around the grocery there's someone with HIV. We eat food...we're just like you," he said.

Added: Fri, November 21, 2008

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Giving Balloons

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Hugs

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Band Members

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Cheerleader

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Cheerleaders

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Team Ursuline

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