Senate GOP effort on Trump border wall seems to fall short


Associated Press

WASHINGTON

An eleventh-hour rescue mission by Republican senators to stave off an awkward defeat for President Donald Trump on his declaration of a national emergency at the Mexican border, and to protect themselves from a politically dicey vote opposing him, seemed to collapse Wednesday.

The setback made it all but certain that defections from his own party will force Trump to cast what could be his first veto – on a struggle directly related to his signature issue of building barricades along the southwest border. It also left Republican senators facing a painful choice: Defy a president who commands passionate loyalty from conservative voters or acquiesce to what many lawmakers from both parties consider a dubious and dangerous expansion of presidential authority.

After a closed-door lunch, GOP lawmakers predicted the Senate would approve a resolution today annulling the emergency Trump has declared along the border. The Democratic-led House passed the legislation last month, meaning Senate assent would send it to Trump.

“It was called ‘turn out the lights, the party’s over,’” said Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., recalling a favorite refrain of “Monday Night Football” announcers when a game was out of reach. “Well, that’s appropriate right now.”

Republicans hoped Trump would support a separate measure curbing a president’s powers to declare future emergencies. Had he done so, they thought, it would be easier for reluctant GOP senators to support the emergency Trump has proclaimed to steer $3.6 billion more than Congress has approved for barrier construction.

But during the GOP lunch, Trump called Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, chief sponsor of the bill limiting future emergency declarations, and told him he opposed that proposal. The call was described by two officials who weren’t authorized to publicly discuss the matter and described it on condition of anonymity.

“There’s been numerous efforts to engage with the vice president and the president, and the president’s not persuaded that he should support it right now,” said Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, who advises GOP leaders. “I don’t know of any president that likes to give up power.”

Lee said later in a statement that he will back the resolution canceling the border emergency because his own bill now lacks “an immediate path forward.”

That would make him the fifth Republican senator to oppose the border emergency – more than enough to send the resolution to the White House.

With Republicans controlling the Senate 53-47, it will take just four GOP defections to approve the measure, which the House passed last month.

Also saying they would vote no were GOP Sens. Thom Tillis of North Carolina, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Kentucky’s Rand Paul.

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