A ‘new dawn’ in DC


Staff and wire reports

WASHINGTON

Cheering Democrats returned Nancy Pelosi to the House speaker’s post Thursday as the 116th Congress ushered in a historically diverse freshman class eager to confront President Donald Trump in a new era of divided government.

Pelosi, elected speaker 220-192, took the gavel saying U.S. voters “demanded a new dawn” in the November election that swept the Democrats to a House majority and are looking to “the beauty of our Constitution” to provide checks and balances on power. She faced 15 dissenting votes from fellow Democrats.

For a few hours, the promise of a new era was the order of the day. The new speaker invited scores of lawmakers’ kids to join her on the dais as she was sworn in, calling the House to order “on behalf of all of America’s children.”

Even Trump congratulated her during a rare appearance at the White House briefing room, saying her election by House colleagues was “a tremendous, tremendous achievement.” The president has tangled often with Pelosi and is sure to do so again with Democrats controlling the House, but he said, “I think it’ll be a little bit different than a lot of people are thinking.”

U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan of Howland, D-13th, was sworn in to the 116th Congress. This is his ninth term as a member of the House of Representatives.

Ryan voted for Pelosi for House speaker.

“Since my first day in our nation’s capital, I have been committed to fighting for the people in Northeast Ohio, and I will continue to do that every day,” Ryan said. “We must rise above partisan politics and work together to solve our nation’s problems, while at the same time preforming Congress’ Constitutional duty to act as a check on the Executive Branch. As we begin a new term, we must redouble our efforts to ensure that no American is left behind.”

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, was also sworn in for his third term. Brown was escorted by his fellow Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, and joined by his wife, Connie Schultz, and their family. Brown is only the fourth Ohio senator in history to be popularly elected to a third term.

Brown said the first order of business must be to reopen the government and again called on President Trump to end the government shutdown.

“I am grateful to the people of Ohio for giving me the opportunity to serve them, and I look forward to continuing our fight together to uplift the dignity of work and stand up for all workers,” Brown said.

As night fell, the House quickly got to work on the partial government shutdown, which was winding up Day 13 with Trump demanding billions in Mexican border wall funding to bring it to an end.

Democrats approved legislation to reopen the government — but without the $5.6 billion in wall money, which means it has no chance in the Republican Senate.

The new Congress is like none other. There are more women than ever before, and a new generation of Muslims, Latinos, Native Americans and African-Americans is creating a House more aligned with the population of the United States. However, the Republican side in the House is still made up mostly of white men, and in the Senate Republicans bolstered their ranks in the majority.

In a nod to the moment, Pelosi, the first female speaker who reclaimed the post she lost to the GOP in 2011, broadly pledged to make Congress work for all Americans — addressing kitchen table issues at a time of deep economic churn — even as her party readies to challenge Trump with investigations and subpoena powers that threaten the White House agenda.

Pelosi promised to “restore integrity to government” and outlined an agenda “to lower health costs and prescription drug prices and protect people with pre-existing medical conditions; to increase paychecks by rebuilding America with green and modern infrastructure from sea to shining sea.”

The day unfolded as one of both celebration and impatience. Newly elected lawmakers arrived, often with friends and families in tow, to take the oath of office and pose for ceremonial photos. Then they swiftly turned to the shutdown.

Vice President Mike Pence swore in newly elected senators, but Senate Republicans under Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had no plans to consider the House bills unless Trump agreed to sign them into law. That ensured the shutdown would continue, clouding the first days of the new session.

McConnell said that Republicans have shown the Senate is “fertile soil for big, bipartisan accomplishments,” but that the question is whether House Democrats will engage in “good governance or political performance art.”

It’s a time of stark national political division that some analysts say is on par with the Civil War era. Battle lines are drawn not just between Democrats and Republicans but within the parties themselves, splintered by their left and right flanks.

Pelosi defied history in returning to the speaker’s office after eight years in the minority.

, overcoming internal opposition from Democrats demanding a new generation of leaders. She will be the first to regain the gavel since Sam Rayburn of Texas in 1955.

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