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Prostate awareness

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Prostate awareness

WARREN

As part of Prostate Awareness Month this month, Mercy Health is offering free prostate screenings to men older than 40 who are uninsured or underinsured from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Sept. 20 at the Warren City Health Department, second floor, 258 E. Market St.

A free dinner will be provided to all screening participants. To register for the screening or to schedule transportation if necessary, call 330-841-2596.

Besides Mercy Health Foundation, other sponsors are Man Up Mahoning Valley, NEO Urology, Grace AME Church, NEO Gastroenterology & Endoscopy Center and the city health department.

Dr. Spirtos joins staff

SALEM

Dr. Charles Spirtos, board-certified radiologist, recently joined the staff of Salem Radiologists Inc. and is also a member of Salem Regional Medical Center’s medical staff.

A graduate of Poland Seminary High School, Dr. Spirtos earned his undergraduate degree from Youngstown State University and his Medical Degree from Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown. He then completed his radiology residency training at MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland, followed by a fellowship in combined Nuclear Medicine-PET/CT at Cleveland’s University Hospitals Case Medical Center.

Sleep seminar

BOARDMAN

Dr. Ted Suzelis, ND, is having a free Getting a Restful Night’s Sleep Seminar at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the Ohio Naturopathic Wellness Center, 755 Boardman-Canfield Road, Suite D3, in the Southbridge West Complex.

An estimated 50 million to 70 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders or sleep deprivation. Dr. Suzelis will help participants discover the simple, natural things they can do to help them get the restful, restorative sleep they need every night.

Call 330-729-1350 or go to OhioND.com to reserve your spot for the seminar.

Researchers findings

COLUMBUS

Physician researchers with Ohio State University College of Medicine at the Wexner Medical Center say increased levels of the hormone aldosterone, already associated with hypertension, can play a significant role in the development of diabetes, particularly among certain racial groups. Study results have been published online by the Journal of the American Heart Association.