ODDLY ENOUGH


ODDLY ENOUGH

Condo spends $2,500 on DNA kits to solve dog poop mysteries

ANNAPOLIS, Md.

Fed up with dog poop being left around, board members at a Maryland condominium complex are now relying on DNA samples to police unscooped feces.

Jeanne Fisher, the general manager for The Residence at Park Place Condominium, tells The Capital newspaper that she came across “doggie DNA” as an option when residents began complaining about unscooped poop. The Annapolis complex had tried emails, dog meetings, fines and a security camera in the dog park.

The condo association spent about $2,500 on pet DNA kits and about 20 owners began providing samples. Fisher says a sample is taken if someone hasn’t cleaned up after their pet. If matched, a fine will be levied along with about $90 in costs if the association decides to send a specimen to a lab for testing.

Python discovered under hood of motorist’s SUV

OMRO, Wis.

A Wisconsin motorist was in for a slithery surprise after his mom’s sport utility vehicle began acting strangely.

Chris Nguyen pulled over Aug. 23 in the town of Omro and popped the SUV’s hood to find a 4-foot-long python inside. Fittingly, the snake damaged the engine’s serpentine belt.

Omro police responded and tried to wriggle the snake from the engine. They called “The Snake Man” Steve Keller – a Menasha man who rescues snakes – for help.

Authorities say the snake was identified as a ball python. Its owner said it’s been missing for more than a month.

It’s illegal to have these snakes in Omro, so the snake’s owner was fined. WBAY-TV reports that police said they’d dismiss the ticket if the owner pays for damages to Liz Nguyen’s vehicle.

Keller says he’ll adopt the python.

Low-number Del. license plate auctioned for $410K

REHOBOTH, Del.

Low-numbered Delaware license plates are in demand.

Someone paid $410,000 for the plate bearing the number 20 when it went up for auction recently at the Rehoboth Beach Convention Center.

John Wakefield, of Delaware Tag Traders, tells the Delaware News Journal the price exceeded expectations. He says it surpassed $325,000 spent on a number 14 license plate three years ago.

Wakefield says a number like 20 “generates quite a stir and a buzz.”

Wakefield likens the license plate auction to baseball cards. He says “it’s a Delaware thing.”

Associated Press

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