Oral injuries lead to recall of Spam


Oral injuries lead to recall of Spam

AUSTIN, MINN.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is recalling more than 228,000 pounds of Spam and another product made by Minnesota-based Hormel after four consumers complained about metal objects in the food.

The USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service says the canned chicken and pork in question was produced in February at the company’s plant in Fremont, Neb. The agency says “minor oral injuries” have been reported.

The recall covers 12-ounce metal cans containing “SPAM Classic” with a “Best By” date of February 2021 date. Those products were shipped throughout the U.S.

Police: Women held captive passes note

DELAND, Fla.

Florida authorities say a woman who was beaten and held captive for two days at gunpoint by her boyfriend escaped when she persuaded him to bring their dog to an animal hospital – and then slipped a note to a staff member.

The Daytona Beach News-Journal quotes the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office as saying 39-year-old Jeremy Floyd was arrested at DeLand Animal Hospital. He is being held without bond on domestic violence and other charges.

The report says Floyd beat the woman Wednesday and refused to let her leave their home. Two days later, she convinced Floyd to let her take their dog to a veterinarian, although he wouldn’t let her go alone.

Lava enters property of geothermal plant

HONOLULU

Lava from the Kilauea volcano reached a geothermal power plant on the Big Island on Sunday, approaching wells that have been capped to protect against the release of toxic gas should they mix with lava.

The lava breached the property overnight and was within 200 yards of the nearest well, said David Mace, a spokesman for the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

A plant spokesman, Mike Kaleikini, told the news agency Hawaii News Now that the lava was as close as 130 feet from wells. He said there was no indication of the release of the poisonous gas hydrogen sulfide, the greatest fear should lava hit the wells.

Fla. panhandle braces as Alberto approaches

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.

Beaches in Florida were largely empty ahead of Memorial Day as the first named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season, Subtropical Storm Alberto, approached the northern Gulf Coast carrying brisk winds and heavy rain.

The storm disrupted long holiday weekend plans from Pensacola in the Florida Panhandle to Miami Beach on Florida’s southeastern edge. Lifeguards posted red flags along the white sands of Pensacola Beach, where swimming and wading were banned amid high surf and dangerous conditions.

It also triggered mandatory evacuations of some small, sparsely populated Gulf Coast barrier islands in one Florida county.

Lightning storms in UK disrupt travel

LONDON

British meteorologists said thousands of lightning strikes hit the U.K. during a powerful overnight thunderstorm, and a London-area airport reported flight disruptions Sunday after an aircraft refueling system was damaged.

London Stansted Airport said that a lightning strike disabled the fueling system “for a period this morning. Engineers have been on site and have now restored the system, however flights may still be subject to diversion, delay or cancellation.”

More than 200 flights were delayed at Stansted. Another 31 departures and 18 arrivals were cancelled, according to FlightStats, which provides data on commercial aviation.

Associated Press

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