Sanctions, cyberattack among possible UK moves on Russia

LONDON (AP) — Britain has given Moscow until midnight today to explain how a Russian-made nerve agent came to poison a former spy in Britain. If no explanation is given, Prime Minister Theresa May says Russia will be hit by "extensive" retaliatory measures.

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said U.K. officials are speaking to allies in the European Union and beyond to draw up a "commensurate but robust" response to the attack, which has left Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in critical condition.

Britain has faced a similar crisis before. After former Russian agent Alexander Litvinenko was killed in London with radioactive poison in 2006, London expelled several Russian diplomats, imposed visa restrictions, broke off intelligence cooperation and froze assets of the two prime suspects.

Critics say that response was too weak, and claim Britain was reluctant to act because London's property market and financial sector are magnets for billions in Russian money.

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