QUARTERBACKS


QUARTERBACKS

Louisville’s Jackson impressive as QB

As promised, former Louisville quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Lamar Jackson spent Saturday at the NFL scouting combine slinging it and not winging it.

Jackson didn’t show off a big arm like Wyoming’s Josh Allen, the other prime prospect in his throwing group Saturday.

But nobody else did, either: Allen wowed the coaches with a 66-yard pinpoint pass at one point during the first of two sessions with the quarterbacks and wide receivers at Lucas Oil Stadium.

Jackson, though, was much more explosive than Allen was in his drops, consistently getting 7 yards deep on five-step drills whereas Allen made up for his poorer footwork with his superior arm strength.

Widely considered the best running quarterback since Michael Vick but a thrower who still needs polish, Jackson shook off some apparent jitters to show off a good enough passing prowess to justify his reticence to switch to wide receiver. Jackson never caught a single pass at Louisville, where he threw for 9,043 yards and 69 touchdowns, ran for 4,132 yards and 50 TDs in 38 games.

DEFENSIVE LINEMEN

Reports: Hurst has heart condition

Utah defensive lineman Lowell Lotulelei says Michigan defensive lineman Maurice Hurst Jr. told him Saturday that he had been diagnosed with the same heart condition as Lotulelei’s older brother, Star. The comments came shortly after ESPN.com first reported Hurst will not be allowed to participate in drills.

League spokesman Michael Signora confirmed that players can be held out based on certain diagnoses but that he believed Hurst was still in town. Jeff Foster, president of National Football Scouting, declined to confirm details of what happened because of privacy concerns.

Hurst had been rising steadily on mock draft boards.

The 6-foot-2, 280-pound defensive tackle had 59 tackles and 51/2 sacks last season. He also had 13 tackles for loss and has been considered one component of a deep class of defensive tackles in this year’s draft.

OFFENSIVE LINEMEN

Sooners’ Brown has historically bad drills

The only thing that’s gone well for Oklahoma’s massive tackle Orlando Brown Jr. this week is a vote of confidence from his Heisman Trophy-winning teammate.

“When are you ever going to watch Orlando Brown run 40 yards down the field?” quarterback Baker Mayfield asked. “You can watch last year’s tape and see he allowed zero sacks. I’d say that’s pretty important for a left tackle.”

But measures matter, too, and Brown’s wretched week will undoubtedly stick in the minds of scouts, coaches and general managers leading up to the draft next month.

The nearly 6-foot-8, 345-pound left tackle managed just 14 reps on the 225-pound bench press, the lowest total of any lineman who has lifted at the combine this week.

Things only got worse Friday for the son of former Browns and Ravens right tackle Orlando Brown .

He lumbered through the 40-yard dash in 5.85 seconds. Even by big O-linemen standards, that’s sloth-like slow.

His vertical jump was just 191/2 inches and his 6-foot-10 broad jump was off-the-charts bad, as well.

Historically, offensive tackles post a tad more than 25 reps in the bench press, run the 40-yard dash in 5.24 seconds and average 28.4 inches in the vertical jump and more than 81/2 feet in the broad jump.

Associated Press

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