Marijuana grow site gets state approval to begin planting


Marijuana grow site gets state approval to begin planting

RAVENNA

Ohio has issued its first certificate of operation to allow a Northeast Ohio medical-marijuana cultivator to begin growing plants.

The Cincinnati Enquirer reports FN Group Holdings received its certificate Friday from the Ohio Department of Commerce after an inspection Tuesday of the company’s Ravenna grow site in Portage County.

Officials say about a half-dozen more inspections have been scheduled for the next month.

A state law approved in 2016 called for medical marijuana to be available for sale to patients with physician recommendations by Sept. 8.

State officials have said it is unlikely medical pot will be available by that date because of delays in inspecting Ohio’s 25 licensed growers.

Woman, boyfriend plead guilty in death of her disabled son

CLEVELANd

A woman and her boyfriend have pleaded guilty in the death of the woman’s 5-year-old developmentally disabled son found buried in a backyard of a Cleveland home.

Thirty-four-year-old Larissa Rodriguez was sentenced to 25 years in prison by a judge in Cleveland on Thursday.

Thirty-six-year-old Christopher Rodriguez received 28 years for the death of Jordan Rodriguez, whose body was found in December wrapped in blankets with mothballs.

A Cuyahoga County prosecutor said Jordan was born premature with only one kidney. A medical examiner couldn’t determine how the boy died but said his body showed signs of suspected abuse.

Larissa Rodriguez told authorities she found her son unresponsive. She gave birth to her 10th child in April at the county jail.

The couple’s attorneys couldn’t be immediately reached for comment Friday.

Toledo suit claims traffic-camera penalties unconstitutional

TOLEDO

Toledo has sued the state of Ohio saying a law that reduces state funding for cities collecting automated traffic camera fines is unconstitutional.

The Blade reports the suit filed Thursday comes a week after the state Supreme Court said two lower court rulings siding with Toledo over the local funding issue infringed on the General Assembly’s lawmaking powers.

Toledo Law Director Dal Emch says that if the state is allowed to enact such penalties, the Legislature could use its authority to control local governments in other situations.

Associated Press

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