‘Last Cowboys’ book chronicles legendary Utah rodeo family


‘Last Cowboys’ book chronicles legendary Utah rodeo family

ST. GEORGE, Utah

A Utah family that has produced several generations of rodeo champions is chronicled in a new book called “The Last Cowboys.”

The Wrights family book written by New York Times’ Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter John Branch was released May 15. Branch spent more than three years with the Wrights to put it together, The Spectrum reported.

The Wrights, from the southern Utah town of Milford, have produced generation after generation of rodeo champions. But the book isn’t just about winning saddle bronc titles. It’s about a family’s challenge adapting to a changing American West as the world grows smaller.

It’s about a parcel of land on Smith Mesa and whether the Wrights can, or even should, remain there. It’s about the Old West becoming new.

“I wanted to be able to highlight the broader picture,” Branch said. “The drought, the federal land use, the organization of the West. . Cities and small towns are dying, but some are booming, and that brings its own kind of problems.”

Branch said he rarely begins to write a story without knowing the end, but he knew “The Last Cowboys” would be an exception.

Pakistan’s former spy chief banned from travel over book

ISLAMABAD

The former head of Pakistan’s powerful spy agency has been banned from travel and will face a formal inquiry over a book he co-authored with his former Indian counterpart.

Maj. Gen. Asif Ghafoor, an army spokesman, said retired Lt. Gen. Asad Durrani was summoned to army headquarters recently for questioning about “Spy Chronicles,” a book that documents his exploits as head of Inter-Services Intelligence from 1990 to 1992.

The army has not detailed its concerns, but it may have been angered by the authors’ suggestion that Pakistan cooperated with the U.S. in the 2011 raid that killed Osama bin Laden. Durrani retired nearly two decades before the raid.

The book was co-written by A.S. Daulat, the former head of India’s Research and Analysis Wing, and Indian journalist Aditya Sinha.

Associated Press

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