ODDLY ENOUGH


ODDLY ENOUGH

Parks celebrate 150 years with pink-flamingo record

BUFFALO, N.Y.

Parks officials in Buffalo, N.Y., are tickled pink over claiming a new world record for having the longest line of garden flamingos.

A Guinness World Records official was on hand June 21 to certify the record – 1,500 pink flamingos – which were set up to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Buffalo’s Olmsted Parks system.

Landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted designed Buffalo’s citywide system of parks and parkways. Parks officials took some liberties with his initials – “F” “L” “O” – to come up with the “FLO-mingo” event.

The previous record for the pink, plastic lawn ornaments was held by Pledge the Pink of Callawassie Island, S.C., which lined up 1,058 flamingos in 2016.

Buffalo residents were invited to adopt the lawn ornaments and display them at home.

Man finds rattler under hood while trying to start car

HANCOCK, N.Y.

An upstate New York man trying to jump-start his car was greeted by an unusual sound coming from his engine – the rattle of a venomous timber rattlesnake.

The man says the snake slithered across the engine block and curled up on the battery as he opened the hood of the car earlier this month in rural Hancock, on the Pennsylvania border about 115 miles northwest of New York City. State environmental conservation police officers were called out to remove the reptile.

Lt. Nate Ver Hague untangled the snake’s tail from the engine as Officer Mark Vencak carefully pulled it from the vehicle.

They released it nearby, next to several large boulders, which state wildlife experts described as “a much more snake-appropriate habitat.”

Omaha zoo finds escaped parrot scared by blimp

OMAHA, Neb.

A macaw that flew away from Omaha’s zoo after apparently being spooked by the Goodyear blimp has been found in a nearby neighborhood.

The Omaha World-Herald reports the macaw, named Cayenne, was out during the zoo’s Birds of Flight show une 24 when it was startled by the blimp drifting past. The bird flew out of an amphitheater and past the zoo’s boundaries.

Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium staff sought the public’s help, and on Monday morning a nearby resident tipped them off about the bird’s whereabouts.

Staffers spotted the bird, and after flying to another tree it came down when called.

The red, green and blue bird, which is a member of the parrot family, was returned to the zoo and quickly joined her sister in eating treats.

Associated Press

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