Captive Calif. kids providing information to investigators


RIVERSIDE, Calif. (AP) — The California children who authorities say were tortured by their parents and so malnourished that their growth was stunted are slowly providing valuable information to investigators, a prosecutor told the Associated Press on today.

"Victims in these kinds of cases, they tell their story, but they tell it slowly. They tell it at their own pace," Riverside County District Attorney Mike Hestrin said. "It will come out when it comes out."

David and Louise Turpin are accused of abusing their 13 children – ranging from 2 to 29 – before they were rescued Jan. 14 from their home in Perris. They have pleaded not guilty to torture and other charges.

A judge signed a protective order today prohibiting the couple from contacting their children, except through attorneys or investigators. Before the brief hearing, Louise Turpin looked at her husband and smiled.

"It protects everyone involved, including my client," David Turpin's attorney, David Macher, said about the order. "I don't want my client exposed to accusations that he attempted to harass or threaten a witness."

Louise Turpin's attorney declined to comment after the hearing.

All of the children remained hospitalized and were relieved to be out of the home, Hestrin said.

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