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NEWSMAKERS

‘Catastrophe’ star Rob Delaney’s son dies from cancer

NEW YORK

“Catastrophe” star and co-creator Rob Delaney says his son has died from cancer.

He memorialized the boy as “smart, funny and mischievous” in a Facebook post.

Delaney sid Henry Delaney was diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2016. After surgery to remove the tumor and treatment early last year, the cancer returned in the fall, and Henry died in January. He was 21/2.

Though left with “significant physical disabilities,” Henry learned sign language and shuffling from place to place “on his beautiful little bum.”

His father says that “his drive to live and to love and to connect was profound.”

Minn. prosecutors object to giving data to Prince’s family

CHASKA, Minn.

Minnesota prosecutors said they’ll object to releasing data connected to Prince’s death because a criminal investigation is ongoing.

KSTP-TV reported this week that attorneys for Prince’s family members are requesting access to investigative data as the siblings determine whether to file a wrongful-death lawsuit. Prince died April 21, 2016, from an accidental overdose of fentanyl. It’s not yet clear how he obtained the drug.

Prosecutors in Carver County released a statement Friday saying law- enforcement data is confidential because the investigation is active. It will stay confidential until a charging decision is made.

Ex-Miss America from Arkansas squares off with state senator

LITTLE ROCK, Ark.

A former Miss America says society could use both engineers and entertainers, and she’s not happy with an Arkansas politician who criticized a university’s decision to promote its dance majors.

After her year as Miss America, Savvy Shields has returned to school as an art major at the University of Arkansas. State Sen. Bart Hester tweeted this week that colleges and universities do not need more money if they promote dance programs rather than programs that produce highly skilled workers.

Shields replied on Twitter that she disagreed, and in an interview she said that during the Renaissance, the arts and the sciences blossomed. She questioned why her home state couldn’t promote both, too.

Associated Press

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