ODDLY ENOUGH


ODDLY ENOUGH

Mom tested positive for opiates after eating bagel

TOWSON, Md.

A Maryland woman has discovered that eating a poppy seed bagel before giving birth carries serious consequences.

Elizabeth Eden told WBAL-TV in Baltimore she was in labor in April when a doctor told her she had tested positive for opiates and she had been reported to the state. The test result meant Eden’s daughter had to stay in the hospital for five days while her mother was assigned a case worker.

Eden said she had learned in a school health class that eating poppy seeds could cause a false positive.

After acknowledging the bagel defense, the case worker closed Eden’s file.

The Federal Institute for Risk Assessment writes that until food manufacturers reduce morphine levels in poppy seeds, it advises against excessive consumption, particularly during pregnancy.

Man befriends wild turkey who moved into his yard

GARDEN CITY, Mich.

A suburban Detroit man who found himself facing fines after a wild turkey moved into his overgrown backyard has made friends with the large bird.

Garden City bans residents from keeping wild animals as pets. The city fined Mark Johnston $100 for harboring the turkey and another $100 for dumping brush at his curb after he cleaned up his backyard in an effort to get the 30-pound turkey to leave.

The city eventually dismissed the turkey ticket since Johnston wasn’t keeping the animal as a pet, The Detroit News reported. Johnston is still fighting the other one.

Meanwhile, the turkey remains in Johnston’s yard. Johnston said that as far as he’s concerned, the bird can stay as long as he wants.

“I have no kids. I’m in the middle of a divorce. I have no one at home,” said Johnston, 45, a tow truck driver. “He kinda keeps me company. It gives me something to come home to.”

Johnston previously hunted turkeys but said he’s given it up, considering his backyard guest.

Johnston’s neighbors don’t seem to have a problem with the turkey, which they said isn’t too noisy.

Wild animals can only be moved if they’re a nuisance or a threat, said Holly Vaughn, a spokeswoman for Department of Natural Resources’ wildlife division.

“He’s not holding it captive,” Vaughn said. “Technically, it’s a wild turkey and is free to go where he wants.”

Associated Press

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