ODDLY ENOUGH


ODDLY ENOUGH

No kidding: Goats chow down in Idaho neighborhood

BOISE, Idaho

About 100 escaped goats munched on manicured lawns in Idaho’s capital city before being rounded up and hauled away August 3.

Multiple news outlets captured the goats calmly eating grass and shrubs in a Boise neighborhood before a trailer arrived amid applause from neighborhood residents.

The goats had been corralled near a local retention pond to eat weeds and other overgrowth, but – perhaps noticing the grass was greener next door – broke through a wooden fence to roam the neighborhood.

Kim and Matt Gabica own the animals as part of their business called We Rent Goats. They gathered the docile herd and said all 118 of the goats were accounted for.

Goats are sometimes let loose in the nearby Boise foothills to eat wild plants and reduce wildfire threats.

Beauty queen resigns title rather than cover tattoos

PHELAN, Calif.

A beauty queen in the Southern California desert community of Phelan has given up her crown rather than cover up her tattoos.

Sierra Leyde didn’t have tattoos when she was named Miss Phelan at age 17. But she celebrated her 18th birthday with tattoos of flowers on her upper arm and shoulder, and a shark on her forearm.

The Phelan Chamber of Commerce then asked her to sign a contract saying she would keep the tattoos covered while in her sash and crown.

Leyde tells KCBS-TV she doesn’t think she should have to cover up because tattoos are now normal, but she decided to drop her title.

The chamber says it has no issues with a Miss Phelan having tattoos, other than asking that they be covered during official events.

Couple thinks they found Prohibition-era booze

QUINCY, Mass.

A couple moving into a Massachusetts home have found what they believe is a stash of Prohibition-era booze.

The Patriot Ledger reports that Ian Sutherland and his girlfriend, Alexa Lee, found dozens of dusty glass bottles and clay jugs shelved behind a false wall in their Quincy home.

A contractor uncovered the hidden compartment while working in the basement in July after the couple had moved in from Connecticut.

Some of the 56 bottles still contain liquid that Sutherland says appears to include beer and moonshine, and that now give off a vinegary smell.

The head of the Quincy Historical Society says it’s still too soon to know how long the bottles were hidden.

Quincy banned alcohol sales in 1880 amid the temperance movement. The house was built in 1910.

Associated Press

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