Seeking justice in the media


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Staff report

YOUNGSTOWN

Black people are seeking justice in the media, said the Rev. Yvonne Hobson of New Bethel Baptist Church at a meeting Saturday afternoon of the Committee to Eliminate Media Offensive to African People.

“It is our hope that you gain an understanding of our goal,” said Ardelia McGee of Youngstown.

Talk of being wronged and misrepresented stood firm in several speeches.

“The struggle for responsible and respectful media is a long one,” said Kenneth King of Youngstown. “In order to have decent coverage of black folk, we have to be involved with the media.”

That is something that stemmed from a need for change, the speakers said.

“A few years ago, a few of us decided we were sick and tired of how we were being misportrayed in the media, so we decided to change it,” explained Betty Dopson of Youngstown.

And CEMOTAP grew from that goal.

Keynote speaker James McIntosh of New York, a psychiatrist, author and activist, discussed a related topic the media cover – President Donald Trump and his plan for black people.

McIntosh said Trump, like many presidents, has a plan for black people, but the importance lies in what plans black people have for Trump.

“When he talks about immigrants, he is talking about black people,” McIntosh said. “Immigrants are black people by proxy, and what is his plan for immigrants?”

Histrionic, borderline psychotic, sociopathic and Adolf Hitler were among the terms McIntosh used to describe Trump.

More than 70,000 psychiatrists and psychoanalysts have deemed Trump unfit for the presidency due to “serious mental illness,” McIntosh said.

“If we want to know what he’ll do, look at what Hitler did,” he said.

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