ODDLY ENOUGH


ODDLY ENOUGH

Trapped tourists call wrong Lisbon police for help

LISBON, Maine

Two tourists who became trapped in an elevator accidently called the wrong Lisbon police department for help.

Dispatcher Cathy Roy told WCSH-TV Tuesday she was working at the Lisbon Police Department in Maine a few weeks ago when she received a call from the trapped tourists. The only problem was they were in Lisbon, Portugal.

Roy says the two women had pressed the elevators’ emergency button for help. No one answered, so the women searched online for “Lisbon Police” and called the first number listed.

Roy says she stayed on the phone with the women and found the right Lisbon police department to call.

Despite the language barrier, Roy says she was able to direct emergency crews to the women and help them escape.

Poison parsnip causes burns, blisters on woman’s legs

ESSEX, Vt.

A woman was left with severe burns and blisters on her legs after encountering an invasive species of plant in Vermont.

Charlotte Murphy says she developed painful blisters overnight after brushing against poison parsnip. Murphy says the blisters got so bad she had to go to the hospital to see a burn specialist.

The Essex woman learned her injuries were comparable to second-degree burns and were caused by the invasive plant.

David Grass of the Vermont Department of Health says the sap in the parsnip has a chemical reaction with the sun that causes accelerated burns. He says people should wear long pants and sleeves while in tall grass.

Murphy says she hopes her experience helps educate people.

Cops responding to 911 call find gator in building

BATAVIA, N.Y.

Police responding to a 911 hang-up call from an abandoned building in western New York found something they weren’t expecting: a 4-foot-long alligator.

WKBW-TV in Buffalo reports officers in the city of Batavia were checking out the inside of the building July 16 for anyone in distress when they found the gator in a make-shift aquarium.

Officers notified the state Department of Environmental Conservation, which sent an environmental conservation officer to the scene. The reptile was handed over to the DEC officer. The agency is investigating.

State environmental conservation laws prohibit the sale or ownership of alligators and other dangerous animals in New York.

Associated Press

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