Passengers rushed to provide CPR to woman in plane emergency


PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A preliminary examination of the blown jet engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that set off a terrifying chain of events and left a businesswoman hanging half outside a shattered window showed evidence of “metal fatigue,” according to the National Transportation Safety Board.

Passengers scrambled to save the woman from getting sucked out the window that had been smashed by debris and a registered nurse and emergency medical technician on the flight rushed to try to help her. She later died, and seven others were injured.

The pilots of the twin-engine Boeing 737 bound from New York to Dallas with 149 people aboard took it into a rapid descent Tuesday and made an emergency landing in Philadelphia. Oxygen masks dropped from the ceiling and passengers said their prayers and braced for impact.

“I just remember holding my husband’s hand, and we just prayed and prayed and prayed,” said passenger Amanda Bourman, of New York.

The dead woman was identified as Jennifer Riordan, a Wells Fargo bank executive and mother of two from Albuquerque, New Mexico. The seven other victims suffered minor injuries.

Retired registered nurse Peggy Phillips told WFAA-TV that she performed CPR on Riordan for about 20 minutes, until the plane landed in Philadelphia.

She said that shortly after takeoff “we heard a loud noise and the plane started shaking like nothing I’ve ever experienced before. It sounded like the plane was coming apart, and I think we pretty quickly figured out that something happened with the engine.”

She said they started losing altitude and the masks came down and “basically I think all of us thought this might be it.”

She then heard a lot of commotion a few rows behind her.

“It was a lot of chaos back there — a lot of really upset people and a lot of noise, and a big rush of air, a big whoosh of air,” Phillips said.

After a flight attendant asked if anyone knew CPR, Phillips and an EMT lay the woman down and performed CPR until the plane was on the ground.

“If you can possibly imagine going through the window of an airplane at about 600 mph and hitting either the fuselage or the wing with your body, with your face, then I think I can probably tell you there was significant trauma,” Phillips said.

The National Transportation Safety Board sent a team of investigators to Philadelphia and NTSB chairman Robert Sumwalt said late Tuesday that one of the engine’s fan blades was separated and missing. The blade was separated at the point where it would come into the hub and there was evidence of metal fatigue, Sumwalt said.

The engine will be examined further to understand what caused the failure. The investigation is expected to take 12 to 15 months.

Photos of the plane on the tarmac showed a missing window and a chunk gone from the left engine, including part of its cover. A piece of the engine covering was later found in Bernville, Pennsylvania, about 70 miles (112 kilometers) west of Philadelphia, Sumwalt said.

As a precaution, Southwest said Tuesday night that it would inspect similar engines in its fleet over the next 30 days.

Don't Miss a Story

Sign up for our newsletter to receive daily news directly in your inbox.