ODDLY ENOUGH


ODDLY ENOUGH

Florida: Gator visits pool as reptiles warm to spring

SARASOTA, Fla.

Florida homeowners beware: One big gator has been found splashing in a backyard swimming pool and it took a trapper to drag it away.

The Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office posted images of the floating gator March 30 on Twitter, saying it measured 11 feet long.

With temperatures warming, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission warns that the state’s estimated 1.3 million gators are becoming more active – and should be treated with “caution and respect.” There’ve been at least two other gator sightings in yards recently, one mistaken for a burglar.

Injuries from alligators are rare, but the commission urges swimming only in designated areas of rivers and lakes.

As for backyard swimming pools, it makes no mention. But for some homeowners, that too is “swim at your own risk.”

Cookies that made day care staff feel high were drug-free

BANGOR, Maine

Officials say cookies dropped off at a Maine day care center that staff members complained made them feel high contained no illicit substances.

About a dozen staff members at Watch Me Shine day care in Bangor reported feeling intoxicated Feb. 14 after they ate Valentine’s Day cookies dropped off by a parent. The Bangor Daily News reports police seized the remaining cookies for testing.

Sgt. Wade Betters said last week that none of the cookies tested positive for controlled substances.

Police don’t know what caused the staff to feel funny and say no charges are pending. The day care now prohibits outside food for children and staff, and no children ate the cookies.

‘Doga’ exercise class boosts dogs’ posture, behavior

HILTON, N.Y.

A New York exercise class is bringing new meaning to the phrase “downward-facing dog.”

A Rochester-area veterinarian is teaching a dog-and-human class called doga, which rhymes with yoga.

Dr. Danni Shemanski of the Hilton Veterinary Hospital tells WHEC that doga can improve dogs’ posture. It also provides people-pet bonding time and a chance for dogs to socialize.

Shemanski says a doga session leaves dogs feeling happy and “important.” She says that can help resolve attention-seeking behavioral issues.

The classes are free but humans are invited to donate to a local animal shelter.

Associated Press

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