Acquitted ex-Tulsa officer volunteers at sheriff's office


TULSA, Okla. (AP) — A white former Tulsa police officer who resigned after being acquitted of manslaughter in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man was sworn in today as a reserve deputy sheriff in a neighboring county.

Wearing a firearm on her hip and dressed in a Rogers County Sheriff's Office uniform, Betty Shelby took her oath of office at the agency in the nearby city of Claremore. While Shelby's duties haven't been determined, she will serve in a volunteer capacity and won't be paid, said Rogers County Sheriff Scott Walton.

Walton, who has been an ardent supporter of Shelby and a critic of the Tulsa County prosecutors who filed a manslaughter charge against her six days after the shooting, told reporters Shelby's first order of business will be to qualify on the gun range with a firearm, just like any other reserve deputy.

"It's not a rinky-dink little deal where you just put a badge on and act like a police officer," Walton said. "We're looking at a police officer with 10 years of service. Betty comes to us as a certified police officer, a drug recognition expert; she teaches report writing."

Shelby, 43, was found not guilty in May of manslaughter in the shooting death of Terence Crutcher. Shelby was on patrol Sept. 16, 2016, when she shot Crutcher as he stood near his SUV in the middle of a Tulsa street.

She returned to the Tulsa Police Department in an administrative position two days after her acquittal, but resigned in July, saying she felt isolated from other officers. Her resignation also brought to an end an internal investigation into Shelby's actions.

Don't Miss a Story

Sign up for our newsletter to receive daily news directly in your inbox.