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Pay tops $1M for heads of nine public colleges



Published: Mon, May 19, 2014 @ 12:00 a.m.

Associated Press

BALTIMORE

The number of public college presidents earning over $1 million more than doubled in the 2012-13 fiscal year from the year before, according to a new survey.

The Chronicle of Higher Education study found that nine college presidents earned more than $1 million in total compensation in 2013, compared to just four in 2012.

Public college presidents first exceeded the $1 million total compensation mark in 2004, according to the survey.

Gordon Gee topped the list, earning $6.1 million as the head of Ohio State University. Gee resigned that post last year after making comments about Roman Catholics, the University of Notre Dame and Southeastern Conference schools. He is now president of West Virginia University.

The study took into account base salary, bonuses, retirement, severance and deferred pay — an incentive offered to presidents who stay in their positions for an agreed-upon period of time.

Four of the college presidents on the top-10 list have retired. Two others have accepted positions at other universities.

The top-10 earners in the fiscal year 2012-13 were:

Gordon Gee, president of West Virginia University

Gee’s compensation total is based on payments he received at Ohio State University, from which he resigned in June of 2013 after six years as president. Gee earned $6.1 million in 2013, which includes $3.3 million in deferred pay and $1.55 in retirement and severance pay.

Bowen Loftin, president of Texas A&M University at College Station

Loftin earned $1.6 million, and resigned from his position in January after three years. He now serves as chancellor of the University of Missouri. Loftin’s $425,000 base salary did not change from 2012 to 2013, however, in 2013, Loftin was paid $950,000 in severance and retirement pay.

Hamid Shirvani, president of North Dakota University system

Shirvani earned roughly $1.3 million in 2013. He retired in June 2013, after less than a year in his position overseeing the 11-campus system. He was paid $962,095 in severance and retirement pay — more than double his $349,000 base salary.

Renu Khator, University of Houston main campus

Khator earned roughly $1.26 million in 2013. She has served in the position since 2008. Nearly 45 percent of Khator’s total compensation comes from bonus pay and deferred pay on top of her $700,000 base salary.

Sally Mason, University of Iowa

Mason earned roughly $1.14 million in 2013, and has served in her position since 2007. More than half of her total compensation is made up of deferred pay on top of her $493,272 base salary.

Michael McRobbie, Indiana University at Bloomington

McRobbie earned approximately $1.1 million in 2013, and has served as the university’s president since 2007. McRobbie earned $567,076 in deferred pay, bonuses and other benefits, and $544,848 in base pay.

Michael Adams, University of Georgia

Adams earned about $1.1 million in 2013, and retired from his position in July. His base pay for the year was $258,760; the vast majority of his total compensation is made up of deferred pay.

Gordon Moulton, University of South Alabama

Moulton earned about $1.1 million in 2013. Moulton retired in January 2013, and died in September. Moulton earned $666,046 in severance and retirement pay, on top of his $406,075 base salary.

Mary Sue Coleman, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

Coleman earned about $1 million in 2013 and has served as president since 2002. On top of her $603,357, Coleman earned $200,000 in bonus pay and $234,000 in deferred pay and retirement pay.

Mark Yudof, University of California system

Mark Yudof, the only top-earning president whose compensation is shy of $1 million, served as president from 2008 until September of 2013, when he retired. Yudof’s total compensation accounts for Yudof’s base pay of $591,084 and $266,000 in retirement pay.


Comments

1samIam(213 comments)posted 3 months, 1 week ago

Yes that's it! Give them the parents mortgaged money and keep both the parents and students in a state of permanent indebtedness to Government and the Corrupt banking system. Oh wait they are one in the same. Least we forget 2007

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2billdog1(1147 comments)posted 3 months, 1 week ago

Unbelievable that any PUBLIC Institution would go to this extreme. These people can not care about the institution if they negotiate these kind of contracts. Yet the people that make the campus' run, like the grounds, housing employees, service providers and maintenance are told there is no money for a 1-1.5% raise. Soon there will be no state universities or colleges and these leaches will be out collecting outrageous pensions with not a care or guilt. The Board of Trustees for each of these institutions should be put in jail.

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3southsidedave(4780 comments)posted 3 months, 1 week ago

This should be no surprise to anyone...no different than a corporation, all intended to increase salaries and benefits for the upper echelon.

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