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Senate control



Published: Sat, June 28, 2014 @ 12:00 a.m.

Leaders protect endangered Dems from tough votes

Associated Press

WASHINGTON

A fear of voting has gripped Democratic leaders in the Senate, slowing the chamber’s modest productivity this election season to a near halt.

With control of the Senate at risk in November, leaders are going to remarkable lengths to protect endangered Democrats from casting tough votes and to deny Republicans legislative victories in the midst of the campaign. The phobia means even bipartisan legislation to boost energy efficiency, manufacturing, sportsmen’s rights and more could be scuttled.

The Senate’s masters of process are finding a variety of ways to shut down debate.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., now is requiring an elusive 60-vote supermajority to deal with amendments to spending bills, instead of the usual simple majority, a step that makes it much more difficult to put politically sensitive matters into contention. This was a flip from his approach to Obama administration nominees, when he decided most could be moved ahead with a straight majority instead of the 60 votes needed before.

Reid’s principal aim in setting the supermajority rule for spending amendments was to deny archrival Sen. Mitch McConnell a win on protecting his home-state coal industry from new regulations limiting carbon emissions from existing power plants. McConnell, the Senate Republican leader, faces a tough re-election in Kentucky.

This hunkering down by Democrats is at odds with the once-vibrant tradition of advancing the 12 annual agency budget bills through open debate. In the Appropriations Committee, long accustomed to a freewheeling process, chairwoman Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., has held up action on three spending bills, apparently to head off politically difficult votes on changes to the divisive health care law as well as potential losses to Republicans on amendments such as McConnell’s on the coal industry.

“I just don’t think they want their members to have to take any hard votes between now and November,” said Sen. Mike Johanns, R-Neb. And there’s “just no question that they’re worried we’re going to win some votes, so they just shut us down.”

Vote-a-phobia worsens in election years, especially when the majority party is in jeopardy. Republicans need to gain six seats to win control, and Democrats must defend 21 seats to the Republicans’ 15.

So Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, probably shouldn’t have been surprised when his cherished bill to fund the Labor, Education and Health and Human Services departments got yanked from the Appropriations Committee’s agenda this month. Word quickly spread that committee Democrats in Republican-leaning states feared a flurry of votes related to “Obamacare.”

“It’s not as if they haven’t voted on them before,” Harkin griped. “My way of thinking is, ‘Hell, you’ve already voted on it. Your record’s there.’” Harkin said.

Two other appropriations bills have run aground after preliminary votes. The normally noncontroversial energy and water bill was pulled from the committee agenda after it became known that McConnell would have an amendment to defend his state’s coal-mining industry. Again, after consulting with Reid, Mikulski struck the bill from the agenda.

McConnell pressed the matter the next day, this time aiming to amend a spending bill paying for five Cabinet departments. Democrats again headed him off.

Democrats privately acknowledge that they’re protecting vulnerable senators and don’t want McConnell to win on the carbon-emissions issue.


Comments

1steivo(462 comments)posted 2 months ago

WHY WHY WHY are the Dumbocrats afraid to vote in the Senate. Could it be that these are popular measures that are good for the country and the party of NO led by Harry Reid just says NO NO NO again.

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2theoldwrench(240 comments)posted 2 months ago

since the repub have filibustered nearly every bill in the senate what can he do The first bill to come up should be the bill McConnell made then immediately Filibustered it when Harry Reid bought the for a vote You say The President has destroyed the country what have the repubs done than to block anything he proposes

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