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Sterling punished harshly; where’s freedom of speech?



Published: Wed, June 11, 2014 @ 12:00 a.m.

Sterling punished harshly; where’s freedom of speech?

I am saddened by recent events concerning Mr. Donald Sterling. My first reaction was that every United States citizen has been guaranteed freedom of speech by our Constitution. And there is also a matter of privacy in one’s own home. Both of these rights have been violated in this situation.

If he isn’t allowed this freedom, then none of us should be allowed to express our opinions about others in the privacy of our own homes. Should there be “bugs” in every home to be sure no one, absolutely no one, speaks ill of another race/person?

The Bible says “let he who is without sin cast the first stone.” We all point our fingers and judge, but how many fingers are pointing back at us? I would say that most every person in this world has “labeled” others with what could be considered a derogatory and racist word.

Please do not take this to mean I approve of Mr. Sterling’s comments. He made a fool of himself in many ways and one of them was by taking on a young girlfriend who obviously used him for whatever he was willing to buy for her. But if she was taking advantage of a good situation, is she any different from the NAACP’s taking Mr. Sterling’s generous donations, knowing he was prejudiced against blacks? I thank God and those who wrote the Constitution and those who fought for our country. Because of them, I can still write this letter, my opinion which I always thought was protected by my right to freedom of speech. I’m thinking the day will come when the Constitution won’t be worth do-diddly. We are still hanging onto our right to bear arms. Now freedom of speech in the privacy of one’s home is being attacked.

The punishment of a criminal should not exceed the crime, and I firmly believe that Mr. Sterling’s punishment far exceeds his crime.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if everyone would expend more energy on loving our neighbors than we do on our prejudices? What a happier and less stressful world we would live in.

Gail Taylor, New Springfield


Comments

1polhack(129 comments)posted 3 months, 2 weeks ago

Amen Ms Taylor. Sterling may be a racist jerk and old fool enough to take up with a gold digging bimbo, but what he says in a private conversation with said bimbo is no ones business but his own. He didn't make his statements public, the bimbo did, no doubt in hopes of more attention. And sure enough, the finger pointing, PC, hand-wringing TV talking heads gave it to her. And how about those principled players who removed their jerseys rather than be identified with Sterling's team? How many of them would have given up their multi-million dollar contracts without a protracted legal battle to backup what was a public statement on their part?

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2jrolley325(800 comments)posted 3 months, 1 week ago

When oh when will donald sterling apologists get through their heads that it wasnt the government who punished him? Beat the "freedom of speech" drum all you want, but he wasnt thrown in jail, the government didnt fine him, and the government didnt forcibly take his team away. Owning a sports franchise isnt a constitutional right.

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3walter_sobchak(1910 comments)posted 3 months, 1 week ago

jrolley
You are 100% correct. The Constitutional guarantee is that the government show make no law abridging the freedom of speech. For the Founders, this, most especially meant political speech. NOBODY ever denied Mr. Sterling to say whatever he wanted. Quite to the contrary, he most certainly said what he wanted but not what is politically correct.

It is said that your right to throw a punch at me stops at the tip of my nose. In other words, when your actions start to infringe on my rights, we have a problem. Mr. Sterling's idiotic comments, while not terribly offensive to some, were very offensive to every other owner of the NBA. Since sponsors were lined up to boycott his team singularly, there was the real possibility of boycotts for the league. This is where it affects other owners and their rights to make a living. I'm sure there are league rules regarding owners and improper conduct and speech. Ask Eddie DeBartolo Jr. if their are conduct clauses in professional sports leagues. Or, what about Oilers/Titans owner Bud Adams and "gestures". No, I don't feel sorry for this billionaire for one instance and he is rightfully paying for his transgressions.

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4meagain(80 comments)posted 3 months, 1 week ago

It’s always about money. On a side note it speaks volumes about our social and moral fiber that everyone is appalled at what he said but not appalled at the fact that he spoke the words to his mistress/lover. That should be equally as offensive to us, but it isn’t. I know men have taken mistresses since the beginning of time. It doesn’t make it right.

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