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Years Ago



Published: Mon, January 13, 2014 @ 12:00 a.m.

Today is Monday, Jan. 13, the 13th day of 2014. There are 352 days left in the year.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

On this date in:

1733: James Oglethorpe and some 120 English colonists arrive at Charleston, S.C., while en route to settle in present-day Georgia.

1794: President George Washington approves a measure adding two stars and two stripes to the American flag, after the admission of Vermont and Kentucky to the Union. (The number of stripes is later reduced to the original 13.)

1864: American songwriter Stephen Foster, who had written such classics as “Swanee River,” “Oh! Susanna,” “Camptown Races,” “My Old Kentucky Home” and “Beautiful Dreamer,” dies in poverty in a New York hospital at age 37.

1898: Emile Zola’s famous defense of Capt. Alfred Dreyfus, “J’accuse,” is published in Paris.

1941: A new law goes into effect granting Puerto Ricans U.S. birthright citizenship.

1945: During World War II, Soviet forces begin a huge, successful offensive against the Germans in Eastern Europe.

1962: Comedian Ernie Kovacs dies in a car crash in west Los Angeles 10 days before his 43rd birthday.

1964: Roman Catholic Bishop Karol Wojtyla (the future Pope John Paul II) is appointed Archbishop of Krakow, Poland, by Pope Paul VI.

1966: Robert C. Weaver is named secretary of Housing and Urban Development by President Lyndon B. Johnson; Weaver becomes the first black Cabinet member.

1978: Former Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey dies in Waverly, Minn., at age 66.

1982: An Air Florida 737 crashes into Washington, D.C.’s 14th Street Bridge and falls into the Potomac River after taking off during a snowstorm, killing a total of 78 people; four passengers and a flight attendant survive.

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1989: Leetonia Village Council agrees to stop demolition of a turn-of-the-century railroad tower on Walnut Street and work toward moving it and preserving it as a historical landmark.

For the first time in 52 years, not a single Mahoning County member of the Ohio House has been named a committee chairman. House Speaker Vernal Riffe not only passed over the Mahoning County delegation for any openings, he demoted Rep. Ronald Gerberry of Austintown from his chairmanship of the Education Committee.

The National Weather Service station at Youngstown Municipal Airport is one of 130 facing closure over the next two years due to budget cutbacks.

1974: Ohio Gov. John J. Gilligan assures Youngstowners that the Ohio EPA will work with industries along the Mahoning River to assure that none have to close rather than meet deadlines for installing water pollution control equipment

John P. Roche, president of the American Iron & Steel Institute, says the problem of imported steel has receded, but not disappeared. American steel mills set production records in 1973, pouring 150 million tons of raw steel.

Two hunters, Ray Janik Jr. and Fred Robb, rescue “Dina,” a Labrador retriever owned by Eugene J. Kritter Jr. of Canfield from an untended trap in which she had been caught for eight days. The Mahoning County game warden says the trapper violated the law by not checking his traps every 24 hours and by not having his name attached to the trap.

1964: A blizzard dumps 16 inches of snow on Youngstown, closing schools, businesses and some industries.

Buick Youngstown Co. will be selling the new Opal Kadett line manufactured by General Motors in Germany.

A 17-year-old Niles youth is caught stealing from the votive candle boxes at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in a stakeout by Police Chief John Ross and two Niles patrolmen. Ross had to make the arrest unassisted because a custodian, unaware of the plan, had locked the patrolmen in their hiding places. The boy, who had $7.60 in his pockets, was turned over to juvenile court.

1939: At least 23 state employees in Mahoning County lose their jobs in what is said to be a “purge” of Democrats across the state by the new Republican administration in Columbus.

Congressman Michael J. Kirwan of Youngstown, who says the failure of Congress to vote a sufficient WPA appropriation in 1937 was responsible for the 1938 recession, says he will vote for the maximum appropriation for the WPA in the coming budget.


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