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Africa sees violent, deadly start to 2014



Published: Sun, January 12, 2014 @ 12:00 a.m.

Associated Press

NAIROBI, KENYA

The death tolls are huge and the individual incidents gruesome. One estimate says nearly 10,000 people have been killed in South Sudan in a month of warfare, while in neighboring Central African Republic combatants in Muslim-vs.-Christian battles have beheaded children.

Sub-Saharan Africa has seen a very violent start to 2014, with raging conflicts in South Sudan and Central African Republic, as well as continued violence in Congo, and attacks in Somalia and Kenya.

Compared with decades past, Africa and its people are suffering from fewer conflicts today, but several recent outbreaks of violence are cause for concern, said J. Peter Pham, director of the Washington-based think tank Africa Center at the Atlantic Council. The conflicts also lack strong international peacekeeping, he said.

“Peacekeeping in Africa, whether under the formal auspices of the United Nations or those of the African Union, suffers today from the same two limitations that they have been burdened with since the very first U.N. peacekeeping mission, the 1960-64 operation in the Congo (ONUC), namely lack of political will resulting in a weak mandate and lack of adequate forces,” he wrote by email.

The conflict that broke out in South Sudan on Dec. 15 saw violence radiate across the country as ethnic groups targeted each other. Shortly afterward, Uganda dispatched troops and military equipment to aid South Sudan’s central government from breakaway units of that country’s military.

Casie Copeland, South Sudan analyst for the International Crisis Group, said violence in Africa tends to involve other countries and noted a “long history of regional involvement in African conflicts.”

The U.N. Security Council on Friday, however, “strongly discouraged external intervention that would exacerbate the military and political tensions.” The U.N. has said more than 1,000 people have died in the South Sudan conflict. But Copeland, after speaking to U.N. workers, aid actors, government officials and combatants, estimates nearly 10,000 have died.

Thousands of French troops and regional African peacekeepers are trying to temper the mob violence.


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