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YSU trustee committee approves 2.4% tuition hike for fall semester



Published: Fri, February 21, 2014 @ 12:09 a.m.

Officials: Increase to generate $2M to offset drops in funding, enrollment

By Denise Dick

denise_dick@vindy.com

YOUNGSTOWN

Full-time Youngstown State University undergraduate students will be paying $94 more per semester next fall, while graduate students pay $158 more per semester under a plan approved by a university trustees committee.

The increases must be approved by the full trustees board, which is set to meet March 12.

The finance and facilities committee at a meeting Thursday approved the increases, which amount to about 2.4 percent for undergraduate students and 3 percent for graduate students. They are the same percentage hikes approved between fall 2012 and fall 2013. A 3.5 percent increase was approved between fall 2011 and fall 2012.

“Even with the increase, YSU is still $1,600 below the statewide average and about $2,000 below the statewide median” of Ohio’s other public comprehensive universities, said Neal McNally, director of budget planning and treasury operations.

The increases will generate about $2 million in revenue, which university officials say is needed to offset declining state funding and enrollment.

Trustee Harry Meshel cast the lone dissenting vote on the increases.

The increase raises from about $3,950 to about $4,044 the cost per semester for resident undergraduate students. The increase is within the tuition cap set by the state. The cap limits annual tuition increases for full-time undergraduate students to $188 per year.

The per-semester cost for resident YSU graduate students increases from about $5,283 to about $5,441.

The tuition plan approved by the committee also includes a continuation of the university’s Affordable Tuition Advantage, a program that offers lower out-of-state charges for undergraduate students in 16 Western Pennsylvania counties, four West Virginia counties and one in New York.

Tuition for those students increases from $4,070 to $4,164 per semester.

Undergraduate tuition for other out-of-state students increases from $6,950 to $7,044 per semester.

Per-semester tuition for nonresident graduate students within the Affordable Tuition Advantage counties increases from $5,403 to $5,561, and for nonregional graduate students, it increases from $6,888 to $7,046 per semester.

The committee’s vote also would increase room and board rates at university halls 2 percent. That change would bring in an additional $150,000 in income.


Comments

1formerdemliberal(182 comments)posted 8 months ago

The tuition increases should be just enough to cover the costs of the next 4 or 5 YSU presidential, provost, and finance director searches.

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2NoBS(1959 comments)posted 8 months ago

“Even with the increase, YSU is still $1,600 below the statewide average and about $2,000 below the statewide median” said Neal McNally. Got that? STILL BELOW STATEWIDE AVERAGE AND MEDIAN. Does this even affect any of you chronic whiners?

Every year, the state provides less and less funding to the STATE universities. Just like Kasich is trying to drive the public schools into nonexistence, it looks like he's trying to do the same to the state universities, OSU excepted, of course.

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3lumper(281 comments)posted 8 months ago

those morons have no shame

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4mrblue(999 comments)posted 8 months ago

I can't see how this is going to help increase enrollment. Increase after increase-------when does it stop? Maybe the trustees should be removed.

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5ytownsfinest50(12 comments)posted 8 months ago

It seems like I read this article every year. Is tuition ever going to go down? Is education ever going to be made more affordable at YSU? I guess that's just wishful thinking. Tuition increases while attendance decreases. Go Penguins!

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6bmanresident(597 comments)posted 8 months ago

Gdog. Us folks living in the real world of private sector jobs have already gone through those cuts many years ago. Boo hoo your niece in her cushy job has to pay into her medical care.

Yay is such a joke. Once they do land a prez, they'll use the extra 2 million to renovate the prez mansion.

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7billdog1(1370 comments)posted 8 months ago

I have watched YSU for the past several years as to their tuition increases compatible to other state institutions of higher education. YSU is a state institution like Toledo, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Wright State, etc... all in depressed areas much like Youngstown. The biggest issue I see with YSU is the gross increases in Presidential pay and creations of jobs that pay six figures in the past 15 years. As many smaller private business' are realizing more lower paying positions create more productivity than a few grossly paid bureaucrats. Even at that most of YSU's students are local, living at home with parents. If students take advantage of the bulk rates they complete an education in 4-4 1/2 years at the price of a new car. Which will last longer? I do realize that on some level students see this as a burden, but way to many students burrow much more than is required for their education. I find it interesting how admittedly some went right to the employees compensation. Many of these employees dealt with pay freezes for over three years none union and union while loosing health benefits, paid compensation time and family benefits do to their spouses having menial jobs in the community. What do you all think these educated people should be compensated? The same as a high school diploma? Many entry level positions on campus are part-time, and pay below the national average in both private and public sector. I do realize that our state and nation are in financial struggles. Yet we need qualified people working at these institutions. This trend of enrollment is a direct result of employment opportunities, Gateway Community College and vocational training, and happens in cycles. Look at the institutions mentioned above. They are experiencing the same difficulties at even higher rates. Kent and Akron lost an even higher percentage of students the last two years. It is hard at times to see how so many can turn on people that they are encouraging their own children to assimilate. If we are going to keep attacking those with an education for their compensation, why would any of us send our children to college for a job where they are going to be hated for their hard work and status? Amazing.

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8Dagwood(129 comments)posted 8 months ago

gdog4766,

Don't forget my extra ketchup when you hand me my food thru the window.

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9redeye1(4560 comments)posted 8 months ago

gdog Why do you think we all should just give things to people who really don't deserve it. Secondly if it offends you that I wish to keep my own money to use as I see fit.. TOO BAD!!!!!!!!!

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10richardlewis973(103 comments)posted 8 months ago

Gdog your niece sounds like a whore!

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11ytownsfinest50(12 comments)posted 7 months, 4 weeks ago

Meanwhile, the University is buying every piece of available land downtown and on the lower northside. Regardless of the decreasing enrollment they continue to expand at the expense of those seeking to further their education.

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