Delta unveils new terminal at JFK


Delta unveils new terminal at JFK

NEW YORK

Delta’s formula for winning over New York travelers is simple: floor-to-ceiling windows, abundant power outlets and a burger joint with a cultlike following.

The airline opened a sprawling $1.4 billion terminal at Kennedy Airport on Friday, a facility more suitable to the high-paying passengers it is trying to attract.

The 346,000-square-foot concourse offers upscale food and shopping options, increased seating and sweeping views of the airport.

It replaces a terminal built by Pan Am in 1960 that was once cutting-edge but had deteriorated, becoming an embarrassing way to welcome millions of visitors to the United States.

Delta Air Lines CEO Richard Anderson said his customers “and the residents of New York now have the international hub facility that they expect and deserve.”

Kennedy Airport is the primary gateway to the U.S. It welcomed 13.1 million inbound international passengers last year, more than any other American airport, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Netflix looks to hook users with ‘Arrested’

SAN FRANCISCO

Netflix is hoping this weekend’s release of the resurrected TV series “Arrested Development” will draw more subscribers to its Internet video service.

The award-winning show about the dysfunctional Bluth family returns Sunday, seven years after Fox canceled the series. The revival coincides with Netflix’s own resounding comeback from a customer backlash over price increases and shareholders’ worries about rising expenses. The adversity had raised doubts about the company’s management and future.

Now, Netflix is winning back subscribers and investors with a bold attempt to establish its $8-per-month service as a home- entertainment powerhouse that rivals the broadcast television networks and premium cable channels such as HBO.

Security concerns with Sprint deal

NEW YORK

Sen. Charles Schumer urged regulators to “use extreme caution” when reviewing the proposed acquisition of No. 3 cell carrier Sprint Nextel by Japan’s Softbank, saying the Japanese company’s use of Chinese networking equipment could open up U.S. networks to snooping and hacking.

The New York Democrat sent letters Friday to the Treasury Department and Federal Communications Commission, both of which are reviewing Softbank Corp.’s offer to buy 70 percent of Sprint Nextel Corp. for $20.1 billion.

“I have real concerns that this deal, if approved, could make American industry and government agencies far more susceptible to cyber attacks from China and the People’s Liberation Army,” Schumer said in a statement.

Satellite TV broadcaster Dish Network Corp. has a competing, $25.5 billion offer for all of Sprint and has raised the security issue as one reason Sprint shareholders should prefer its bid.

Associated Press

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