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oddly enough



Published: Thu, May 23, 2013 @ 12:00 a.m.

oddly enough

Birth of anteater has Conn. zoo staff puzzled

GREENWICH, Conn.

An anteater has given birth at a Connecticut conservation center, prompting officials there to wonder how the mother conceived.

Officials at the LEO Zoological Conservation Center tell the Greenwich Time they had removed the only male anteater from the enclosure in August, long before the six-month gestation period for baby Archie would have begun.

They feared that male, Alf, would kill another baby in the pen.

That left the mother Armani, and the young female, Alice, in the enclosure.

But little Archie was born in April anyway.

Marcella Leone, founder and director of the conservation center, suspects this might be a rare case of delayed implantation, when fertilized eggs remain dormant in the uterus for a period of time.

Thailand urged to explore edible-insect market

BANGKOK

Researchers say Thailand is showing the world how to respond to the global food crisis: by raising bugs for eating.

The United Nations’ Food and Agricultural Organization released a study and handbook Tuesday on what they call “six-legged livestock” — edible bugs and worms that can help meet global food demand that is expected to grow 60 percent by 2050. The agency says they provide a rich source of protein, vitamins and minerals.

The study was conducted in Thailand, where insects including crickets, grasshoppers and bamboo worms long have been a part of diets, especially in rural areas.

Entomologist Yupa Hanboonsong says about 200 insect species are eaten in Thailand. Cricket farming alone already is a $30 million industry there, but only a few other species have been commercially marketed.

Greek beach evacuated after artillery discovery

ATHENS, Greece

A surprise shell has caused a big stir at a popular Athens beach.

Greek authorities evacuated the seafront Monday after a swimmer found a corroded artillery shell just 10 yards from dry land, fished it out and presented it to a lifeguard.

A coast-guard statement said army explosives experts were rushed to Vouliagmeni beach and safely disposed of the munition.

The 12-inch round dated to World War II, when much of the coastline around Athens was heavily fortified.

Athenians have been flocking to nearby beaches over the past few days as the country suffered an early heat wave, with temperatures over 86 degrees.

Associated Press


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