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YSU President Anderson bids farewell



Published: Wed, May 1, 2013 @ 12:01 a.m.
  YSU President Anderson Final Speech

Outgoing Youngstown State University President Cynthia E. Anderson wants people to remember her as a “good and decent person whose career passion was to serve students in any way she was capable.”
“What could possibly be a better legacy than that?” Anderson said Tuesday during her final State of the University address in Kilcawley Center’s Chestnut Room.
Anderson supporters and members of the YSU community, some wearing “Thank you Dr. Anderson” buttons, filled the room. The buttons were donated by Bruce Sherman of Sherman Creative

Outgoing Youngstown State University President Cynthia E. Anderson wants people to remember her as a “good and decent person whose career passion was to serve students in any way she was capable.” “What could possibly be a better legacy than that?” Anderson said Tuesday during her final State of the University address in Kilcawley Center’s Chestnut Room. Anderson supporters and members of the YSU community, some wearing “Thank you Dr. Anderson” buttons, filled the room. The buttons were donated by Bruce Sherman of Sherman Creative

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Cynthia E. Anderson, outgoing president of Youngstown State University, received a standing ovation Tuesday for her years of service at the end of her last State of the University address. Anderson is retiring July 1 after three years as YSU president and has been at the university nearly 40 years.

By DENISE DICK

denise_dick@vindy.com

YOUNGSTOWN

Outgoing Youngstown State University President Cynthia E. Anderson wants people to remember her as a “good and decent person whose career passion was to serve students in any way she was capable.”

“What could possibly be a better legacy than that?” Anderson said Tuesday during her final State of the University address in Kilcawley Center’s Chestnut Room.

Anderson supporters and members of the YSU community, some wearing “Thank you Dr. Anderson” buttons, filled the room. The buttons were donated by Bruce Sherman of Sherman Creative Promotions Inc. Sherman is past president of the YSU Alumni Society and a current member of the board.

After three years as president and nearly 40 years at YSU, Anderson will retire July 1.

Three finalists have been selected as potential successors and will visit campus beginning Thursday.

“While I don’t play any formal role in the process, please know that I will have the opportunity to tell each candidate that the greatest resource, which Youngstown State University has and has always had, is its human resource,” Anderson said.

She also talked about the challenges the university has faced during her tenure and will continue to face.

“As the campus knows all too well, we have experienced a temporary decline in enrollment numbers — thus translating into declining revenues,” Anderson said.

Fall 2012 enrollment slipped 5 percent to 13,813, compared with fall 2011’s 14,540. The number of students enrolled also fell the previous year from 15,194 in fall 2010 to 14,540 in fall 2011.

She said the faculty and staff helped the university respond.

YSU has streamlined processes, left positions vacant, changed health care plans and reduced the budget by more than $2.5 million, the president said.

“I put those remarks into a cautious and pragmatic perspective,” she said. “As I turn the leadership of this university over to a new president, I have been insistent that our plans for the coming fiscal year are comprehensive and have asked the vice presidents to coordinate planning for alternative spending scenarios. We have got to continue to be diligent with our funds.”

Anderson also touted the accomplishments of several students.

Julie Sole is employed as an engineer at V&M Star. Cary Dabney, a senior, earned a dean’s fellowship to Harvard University. Cory Okular was awarded a full assistantship at the University of Notre Dame.

“We have every reason to brag about our students,” she said.

Okular praised Anderson for her involvement with students.

She’s friendly and outgoing and genuine, he said.

“What you lack in height, you make up for in heart,” the student said.

Anderson has been a friend to students, Okular said.

“You set the standard for how a president should interact with students, how a president should reach out to students,” he said.


Comments

1WVK72855(1 comment)posted 1 year, 7 months ago

As a two time Youngstown State University graduate I can honestly say that I am glad that President Anderson is vacating the office of President of YSU. I was an undergraduate student both during Dr. Sweet's and also Dr. Anderson's tenures and I feel that Dr. Anderson's decisions were not in the university's best financial interests. Youngstown State is a shining star in the Mahoning Valley. It deserves a president that will work to make it more accessible to the valley and also more affordable for anyone that wishes to pursue a higher education.

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2walter_sobchak(1978 comments)posted 1 year, 7 months ago

The current role of the college president is mainly fund-raising and establishing ties with the local business and philanthropic institutions to help keep funds rolling in to the university. Establishing academic excellence with the students and faculty is a matter for the provost, with the president show-casing and promoting it. President Cochran and Sweet did a good job of this as can be seen with the enormous contributions to the school that built the wellness center and the Williamson building. After only 3 years of her tenure, which was obviously motivated by maximizing her pension, it doesn't appear that Dr. Anderson will leave a lasting impression on the university, unless I am missing something.

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3RoddAC(97 comments)posted 1 year, 7 months ago

To WVK72855: Who cares about your opinion. Too much negativity...why pass it on? Constructive criticism when sometime can be done about it may be of a help at times. Criticism when nothing can be done about it is not only worthless but destroys positive energy. Dr. Anderson gave a wonderful 40 years to the university and was at the helm during the most difficult economic times. If you are, or were a student, you should realize how affordable YSU is AND what a high quality education it provides. This valley needs more positive reinforcement, not negative.

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4YUYMe(2 comments)posted 1 year, 7 months ago

Ask the Ronald Regan question, "is YSU, and the community, better off now than it was three years ago?" I'm afraid on many fronts the answer is no (unless you were President Anderson and her bffs who got very large raises each year). Enrollments, funding and morale are down as well as the majority of YSU employee's actual earnings. It's already harder to attract students now just wait until we lose faculty and the deversity of courses presently offered. Why bring this up? Not to be negative but because as Ben Franklin said, "It's crazy to do the same thing over and over again and expect a different result." It's about the same people that selected President. Anderson that will select the next president. Are they doing the same thing again? Same type of person? Same downward spiral? We need a game changer. Say no to these three candidates and beg Jim Tressel to take the job. It's amazing the positive impact he already has had at UofA and could have here.

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5lumper(284 comments)posted 1 year, 7 months ago

check wkbnnews.com for don slater, canfield,ohio

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