facebooktwitterRSS
- Advertisement -
  • Most Commentedmost commented up
  • Most Emailedmost emailed up
  • Popularmost popular up
- Advertisement -
 

« News Home

Robinwood Lane discovers magic of science



Originally Published: 12:00 a.m., March 15, 2013 and  Updated 09:34 a.m., March 15, 2013

photo

Neighbors | Natalie Scott.Chemistry professor and faculty advisor to the YSU branch of the American Chemical Society Mike Serra observed the YSU students doing experiments.

photo

Neighbors | Natalie Scott.YSU chemistry student Mike Macinga (right) watched as his fellow student, Brian Kamerer, used a banana frozen with liquid nitrogen to hammer a nail into a piece of wood Feb. 28.

photo

Neighbors | Natalie Scott.YSU chemistry students, from left, Jeana McEvey, Joe Strozier, Brian Kamerer, and Mike Macinga showed experiments to studnets at Robinwood Lane Elementary School Feb. 28.

photo

Neighbors | Natalie Scott.YSU chemistry student Mike Macinga mixed two chemicals together to create a reaction in the form of a long string of foam coming out of the tube where the chemicals were mixed Feb. 28.

By NATALIE SCOTT

nscott@vindy.com

Members from the YSU sector of the American Chemical Society, Mike Macinga, Jeana McEvey, Joe Strozier, and Brian Kamerer, as well as their faculty adviser, chemistry professor Mike Serra, visited Robinwood Lane Elementary School Feb. 28 to teach and astound students with the magic of chemistry.

The group came to the school to perform experiments that the Robinwood students might see as magic, but Serra explained how each experiment was done and why the chemicals react the way they do.

The experiments started with simple physical changes and progressed into larger chemical reactions. They began by using liquid nitrogen to freeze a whole banana. To show the power of the change, the banana was used to hammer a nail into a piece of wood.

Next, the scientists used a baking soda and vinegar mixture to show how the vapors can put out a fire.

Another impressive experiment was Serra dipping a dollar bill in ethanol and lighting it on fire. Once the flames stopped, the bill was unharmed.

The experiments ended by showing the Robinwood Lane students how, when different chemicals are lit on fire, different colors for fireworks are created.

In the last experiment, McEvey blew an undisclosed powder through a tube and onto a flame to give Robinwood students a fiery ending.


Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.


News
Opinion
Entertainment
Sports
Marketplace
Classifieds
Records
Discussions
Community
Help
Forms
Neighbors

HomeTerms of UsePrivacy StatementAdvertiseStaff DirectoryHelp
© 2014 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator.
107 Vindicator Square. Youngstown, OH 44503

Phone Main: 330.747.1471 • Interactive Advertising: 330.740.2955 • Classified Advertising: 330.746.6565
Sponsored Links: Vindy Wheels | Vindy Jobs | Vindy Homes | Pittsburgh International Airport