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LifeLine personal safety app will notify cops in 20 seconds



Published: Sun, March 3, 2013 @ 12:09 a.m.

Staff report

YOUNGSTOWN

A college freshman is walking to her car from class at the end of the day. It’s nighttime, and the unthinkable happens: Someone comes up behind her and attacks her.

The attacker doesn’t know that the woman, upon leaving the classroom, had launched the LifeLine EDU personal-safety application on her smart phone. When the attacker grabbed her, she dropped the phone, and the app started a 20-second countdown to notifying local authorities.

LifeLine Response Founder Peter Cahill calls it the “21st-century 911. ... In a tenth of a millisecond, our server grabs all the information about her exact location and sends it to our response-verification center.”

What triggers the response is the user’s thumb leaving the cellphone screen, Cahill said. A piercing alarm sounds, and the LifeLine dispatcher attempts to call the user. If no contact is made, LifeLine calls the nearest 911 dispatch center.

“Some people say it’s overkill. What I’m trying to do is prevent the attack from ever taking place,” Cahill said.

LifeLine is one of three personal-safety applications being considered by the Youngstown State University Police Department for use on campus by students, faculty and staff.

YSU Police Chief John Beshara said he’s evaluating the apps, including LifeLine EDU, for cost and effectiveness, but he’s concerned that the technology will be outdated as soon as he signs a contract. His department has tested apps by LifeLine, Guardly and EmergenSee, all of which are compatible with smartphones, including iPhones and Androids, and are downloadable for free.

“We see it as a good tool, as a means to further increase safety and security on campus,” Beshara said. “I’m no tech guy, but I see the good use of it.”

Using a personal-safety app sometimes is better than calling 911 from a cellphone because the call is automatic and instantaneous, said Adam Guerrieri, a YSU police dispatcher. The app also can provide medical information about the caller and, using GPS technology, specific information about the caller’s whereabouts.

LifeLine and Guardly also send a text message and email to the user’s “lifeline” — people previously identified by the user as family and friends who can help in the case of a medical emergency.

“As a law-enforcement officer with a background in SWAT, to be able to get the information that this app provides is critical when it comes to emergency response,” Beshara said. “Seconds to us mean lives.”

A YSU student using such an app would be connected automatically to the university’s emergency-dispatch center, as long as he or she is within the university’s “geo fence” — as far south as the Mahoning River and as far north as Wick Park, Beshara said.

Even though the app is free, there is a cost to the university — anywhere from $20,000 to $50,000 in startup costs, Beshara said. The university would have to sign a contract with one of the technology companies for the app to be effective on campus.

Beshara said he is looking for a way to make the app’s use cost-effective for both students and the university.

Under one scenario, with 6,750 students participating, the cost would be about $3 a year, to be added to the students’ bill, he said.

Beshara said he has talked to students about the app and has the support of student government. He expects to make a decision within the month.

“This is technology I haven’t seen. I think it’s cutting-edge stuff,” he said.


Comments

1buckeyes3696(4 comments)posted 1 year, 5 months ago

Small world, LifeLine Response was just deployed at my school Ohio State two weeks ago....I'll get it twice because I take summer school classes at YSU... So far it's been great

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2Brudog99(16 comments)posted 1 year, 5 months ago

False sense of security. Police departments receive large numbers of false alarms. Most police do not respond promptly to alarm drops of any kind. Call your local police department and ask if they respond "signal 5" to alarm drops. My experience (retired police officer) is your local department will tell you alarms do not call for a high priority response. Even if the police did respond promptly, they are still several minutes away. The damage is done and the violator long gone before help arrives.

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3buckeyes3696(4 comments)posted 1 year, 5 months ago

Brudog99, I'm not a professional but I think that's the whole point of the app to make the perp run.... I as a woman would rather the attacker run away prior to me being sexually assaulted after he hears the alarm and notifies the attacker that the police are enroute.

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4buckeyes3696(4 comments)posted 1 year, 5 months ago

Just found the video and yes it's supposed to make the perp run... Here's the video www.llresponse.com I couldn't find a video talking about the other app.

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5DoninFL(159 comments)posted 1 year, 5 months ago

Several years ago I sold home alarms and alarms to attach to bikes, luggage, etc, would make shrill noise if item was moved.. also a personal alarm to carry on your belt or purse. When the pin was pulled out it made an ear piercing shrill noise. About two inch square. I gave one to each of my daughters and I still have one that I carry with me while riding my bicycle here in Florida.

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6YtownParent(290 comments)posted 1 year, 5 months ago

Kudos to Beshara for stopping and thinking about what he's buying, instead of just signing the charge slip.
It's not a bad idea, but I wonder if there aren't more cost efficient ways to do the same thing using the university's wifi networks or the cellphone's cellular connection. It would be better if Beshara, YSU and the incubator could develop their own solution at a lower cost & market that.

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7YoungstownMom2(1 comment)posted 1 year, 5 months ago

As a long time redsident of Youngstown, mother of two daughters and Senior IT professional at Simon DeBartolo Group, I would not be surprised if the LifeLine back end costs are north of 300k per year. These apps clearly need to be an enterprise solution. YTownParent eludes to a solution that Chief Beshara build an application. It is not feasible considering the cost to build this architecture. The solution needs leverage scales of economy. Now the question to ask is, of these 3 apps, which one is running at the highest availability and uptime? I don't know that answer but plan on investigating it for my own girls.

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