facebooktwitterRSS
- Advertisement -
  • Most Commentedmost commented up
  • Most Emailedmost emailed up
  • Popularmost popular up
- Advertisement -
 

« News Home

Austintown considers raising high grass nuisance fee



Published: Sat, June 22, 2013 @ 12:08 a.m.

By Kalea hall

khall@vindy.com

austintown

After dealing with cutting the grass on some vacant private properties throughout Austintown, township trustees are considering raising the fee that comes with acting as a lawn-care provider.

Instead of charging the usual $55 per hour worked for cutting the lawn of a vacant home, the township would charge a minimum $500.

“My biggest complaint is that the township is not in the landscape business,” said trustee Jim Davis. “My biggest issue is that the money that it costs to do this can be used to pave roads.”

The township trustees, during their next meeting Monday, will discuss increasing the rates charged to cut grass.

Issues with vacant properties in residential neighborhoods causing frustration in Austintown are not new. Ever since the housing market collapsed, the number of homeowners abandoning their properties increased, causing communities across the nation to have to front the cost of cleaning up their neighborhoods.

“This situation is absolutely not isolated,” said trustee Lisa Oles. “It is a nationwide epidemic.”

As soon as spring hits and the grass starts growing, the township gets flooded with calls from frustrated neighbors of vacant homes where the grass is sometimes 2 to 3 feet high. From May 13 to June 10, the township received 109 high-grass nuisance complaints. The township has mowed the grass at 39 of those properties.

At the June 10 trustees meeting, the board approved lawn care for 21 other properties. How many of those lawns were actually cut by the township will not be known until the next trustees meeting. Before taking action and mowing the lawn, the township is required by state law to give the owner of record a seven-day notice of the cost.

“It’s a cumbersome process,” said Darren Crivelli, zoning inspector.

There is a time of legal limbo after a homeowner deserts a house and when the bank actually forecloses on it.

“There really is no responsible owner,” Crivelli said.

It is also a difficult process to get money back to replace the taxpayer dollars the township spent on mowing the lawns. “The last time I looked, we got it back from the property tax — 25 percent of our costs,” said Mike Dockry, township administrator.

The cost for cutting the lawns was more than $40,000 one year, according to Davis.

“Unfortunately there are so many vacancies and foreclosures that this is the problem it has created,” Davis said.

One of these vacant homes sits on Crabwood Drive. The grass is nearly 2 feet tall and can easily be noticed among the neatly cut lawns of the surrounding homes. The neighbors across the street and next door are upset over the eyesore in their neighborhood.

“Anytime you have something like this, certainly it takes away from the [value of] the homes,” said Ken Skelly, a Crabwood resident.

Skelly, who has lived on Crabwood Drive for 47 years, said he does not care who cuts the grass, even if it is his taxpayer dollars being spent.

“It will get [cut] down one of these days,” Skelly said.


Comments

1ytownsteelman(627 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

Neighbors will complain, but no one will ride their mower next door and cut the grass! Its your neighborhood. take a little direct action and help out!

Suggest removal:

2prodgodq(147 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

It depends on the situation. Some of the abandoned houses are owned by the bank, some by the owner who may be trying to rent the house out. And neighbors do cut the grass....I've done it myself with a house near me.
The problem goes deeper than that. Abandoned houses become dilapidated over time, which attracts people who are in the business of stripping those houses of their copper pipe and wire. Unfortunately, the banks or owners can't seem to share in the responsibility of at least mowing the lawn. They seem to want to wait to see who will foot the bill first. Then the township or city has to get involved.

Suggest removal:

3cheybaby2(102 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

ytownsteelman ,,, i agree with you. i have a trailor next door to me., a repo i was cutting the grass every year. now it has a new owner they have yet to cut the grass this year,,, I think they plan on fixing it up to resell. But in the Mean Time Its Getting Tall Enough i cant see to get out of my driveway.. So it looks like either i Call Zoning or we do it ourselves again.. But If more People Would Just Get Off There Rear Gears and Take action and clean your Area Up. Or you sit complain till the Cows Coming home.and watch your neighborhood go to the Dogs,

Suggest removal:

4DAL(90 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

I don't mind cutting the grass if the house next store is vacant, but I do have a problem with these banks that have foreclosed house and take no responsibility for them. I pay my taxes, keep my yard & house maintained and don't mind helping the next guy but when it comes to helping these banks maintain their properties, No Going To Happen!! The townships that have to cut the grass for these bank foreclosed homes, need to send a bill to the banks that own these houses for maintenance fees!! The CEO's of these banks can start to earn their pay!!

Suggest removal:


News
Opinion
Entertainment
Sports
Marketplace
Classifieds
Records
Discussions
Community
Help
Forms
Neighbors

HomeTerms of UsePrivacy StatementAdvertiseStaff DirectoryHelp
© 2014 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator.
107 Vindicator Square. Youngstown, OH 44503

Phone Main: 330.747.1471 • Interactive Advertising: 330.740.2955 • Classified Advertising: 330.746.6565
Sponsored Links: Vindy Wheels | Vindy Jobs | Vindy Homes | Pittsburgh International Airport