facebooktwitterRSS
- Advertisement -
  • Most Commentedmost commented up
  • Most Emailedmost emailed up
  • Popularmost popular up
- Advertisement -
 

« News Home

Grilli came out of nowhere to become Pirates’ closer



Published: Sat, February 16, 2013 @ 12:00 a.m.

Associated Press

BRADENTon, fla.

At some point in April, the door to the Pittsburgh Pirates bullpen will open in the top of the ninth inning. The Pirates will be ahead, and Jason Grilli will jog onto the field.

Over the PNC Park speakers, a Pearl Jam song — Grilli won’t say which one — will play while images of the National League’s oldest closer will flash across the video board.

It will be a moment an entire career in the making. One the 36-year-old right-hander thought might not come after spending a decade-plus as a baseball nomad, bouncing from team to team and role to role without seeming to find the right fit.

Just don’t expect Grilli to waste much time taking it all in.

“I’m not going to be running in looking over my shoulder going, ‘Oh man, dig yourself,’” Grilli said with a laugh. “This isn’t about me.”

Only it kind of is. The player was out of baseball three years ago and was toiling in the minors less than two years ago waiting for the phone to ring now finds himself replacing a two-time All-Star for a team very serious about contending in 2013.

Oh, and he’s doing it at a time when most pitchers his age are hanging on, not thriving.

Ask Grilli how a guy — who spent Opening Day 2010 sitting on a trainers’ table in Orlando trying to block out the pain in his surgically repaired right knee somehow — became one of the best setup men in the majors while inching toward his late-30s and he just smiles and shrugs his shoulders.

Faced with his baseball mortality, he had two options: walk away or fight back. Guess which one he chose.

“There’s something inside of me that just kicked in,” he said.

Now the pitcher who has all of five career saves in 330 appearances finds himself the last line of defense for a franchise — much like Grilli — trying to shake an enigmatic past.

How confident are the Pirates in Grilli’s fearlessness, his 95 mph fastball and his health? Confident enough to trade Joel Hanrahan and his 76 saves over the last two seasons to Boston.

The decision wasn’t exactly due to Grilli, and he knows that. Hanrahan’s effectiveness made him too expensive. He will make $7 million this season for the Red Sox, or more than Grilli will make during the entirety of the two-year, $6.75 million deal he signed in the offseason.

There were other suitors for Grilli, but the Pirates offered more money and perhaps just as importantly, some stability. If he stays healthy and plays through the end of his contract, Grilli will have pitched more games for Pittsburgh than any of the five teams he’s suited up for in his career.

“I’m comfortable here,” he said. “My heart is here. I’m tired of changing colors, changing teams, changing agents. It’s been all change for me.”

Pittsburgh took a chance on Grilli in July 2011, plucking him off Philadelphia’s Triple-A roster and asking him to shore up a bullpen that needed help and a veteran presence. Manager Clint Hurdle, whose relationship with Grilli dates back to 2008 when both were in Colorado, called it “taking a chance on the man.”

One that’s paid off considerably for both sides.


Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.


News
Opinion
Entertainment
Sports
Marketplace
Classifieds
Records
Discussions
Community
Help
Forms
Neighbors

HomeTerms of UsePrivacy StatementAdvertiseStaff DirectoryHelp
© 2014 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator.
107 Vindicator Square. Youngstown, OH 44503

Phone Main: 330.747.1471 • Interactive Advertising: 330.740.2955 • Classified Advertising: 330.746.6565
Sponsored Links: Vindy Wheels | Vindy Jobs | Vindy Homes | Pittsburgh International Airport