facebooktwitterRSS
- Advertisement -
  • Most Commentedmost commented up
  • Most Emailedmost emailed up
  • Popularmost popular up
- Advertisement -
 

« News Home

Reduce deficit with care



Published: Thu, February 7, 2013 @ 12:00 a.m.

By Dean C. GARFIELD

McClatchy-Tribune

The focus in Washington is centered squarely on tackling our federal debt and deficits. Continuing our current path is not sustainable and risks burdening our children and grandchildren with bills our government runs up today. But our progeny will look on us with disappointed eyes if America’s long-term economic strength is sacrificed at the altar of short-sighted public policies.

To approach the fiscal challenge, Congress and the president must cut spending. Certainly savings can be found in virtually every federal program; however, deficit reduction should be driven by the nation’s strategic priorities, not blind budget slashing, and not come at the expense of smart investments in research and development, education, and scientific initiatives that are the foundation for economic growth.

Job creation

Research drives innovation, productivity and job creation. From the Internet to GPS to the human-genome map, America’s ability to create next-generation technologies has produced vast economic opportunities. These successes relied on federal investments in long-term research. They spurred significant private investment in technology development. And they generated extraordinary opportunities for a dynamic workforce grounded in science and engineering education. Yet, some lawmakers have targeted these programs for drastic cuts.

Nations like China and India are dedicating enormous resources toward research and education programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Cutting U.S. investments in these areas means relinquishing innovation leadership to our global competitors. Going down this path would result in tomorrow’s game-changing innovation — and the jobs that go with it — more likely coming from Bangalore, India, and not Boston or Austin or San Jose.

Similarly myopic is how lawmakers are searching for new revenues to cut the deficit — Washington-speak for higher taxes. Paying fair taxes is part of the responsibilities of U.S. citizenship. But for American businesses that face stiff global competition, the business tax structure we have today is far from fair. The U.S. has the world’s highest corporate tax rate. If that weren’t enough of an obstacle to U.S. job growth, our system also imposes a double-tax on American companies when they bring foreign earnings home. First, the company pays taxes in the country where its products are sold, and then another tax to the IRS when the business attempts to reinvest those earnings domestically in new facilities or new jobs. The result: the U.S. tax system forces jobs and investments to other countries. That’s wrong. It’s time to bring those dollars home.

Tax rate cut

Responsibly lowering the business tax rate and eliminating the double-tax on foreign earnings would be a major boost for the U.S. economy. A rate cut from the current 35 percent to 25 percent would create an estimated 581,000 U.S. jobs in each of the next 10 years. Shifting to a competitive, market-based system where companies’ overseas earnings are taxed once — where they’re earned — would be another major step forward. American companies with operations at home and abroad are responsible for 63 million U.S. jobs.

In all of these decisions, something President Obama said last year can be a guide: “It’s a lot easier to deal with deficits and debt if you’re growing.” Grow, and more businesses expand and more Americans work. People earn and spend more. Put together, more revenues are generated for the federal government.

Dean Garfield is president and CEO of the Information Technology Industry Council, a global advocacy group representing technology and innovation companies. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.


News
Opinion
Entertainment
Sports
Marketplace
Classifieds
Records
Discussions
Community
Help
Forms
Neighbors

HomeTerms of UsePrivacy StatementAdvertiseStaff DirectoryHelp
© 2014 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator.
107 Vindicator Square. Youngstown, OH 44503

Phone Main: 330.747.1471 • Interactive Advertising: 330.740.2955 • Classified Advertising: 330.746.6565
Sponsored Links: Vindy Wheels | Vindy Jobs | Vindy Homes | Pittsburgh International Airport