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Industry develops nontoxic fracking fluids


Published: Mon, February 4, 2013 @ 12:00 a.m.

photo

An unidentified worker steps through the maze of hoses being used at a remote fracking site being run by Halliburton for natural-gas producer Williams in Rulison, Colo. The oil and gas industry is trying to ease environmental concerns by developing nontoxic fluids for the drilling process known as fracking.

Associated Press

PITTSBURGH

The oil and gas industry is trying to ease environmental concerns by developing nontoxic fluids for the drilling process known as fracking, but it’s not clear whether the new product will be widely embraced by drilling companies.

Houston-based energy giant Halliburton Inc. has developed a product called CleanStim, which uses only food-industry ingredients. Other companies have developed nontoxic fluids as well.

“Halliburton is in the business to provide solutions to our customers,” said production manager Nicholas Gardiner. “Those solutions have to include ways to reduce the safety or environmental concerns that the public might have.”

Environmental groups say they welcome the development but still have questions.

The chemicals in fracking fluids aren’t the only environmental concern, said George Jugovic, president of PennFuture. He said there is concern about the large volumes of naturally occurring but exceptionally salty wastewater and air pollution.

It’s premature to say if it will ever be feasible to have fluids for fracking that are totally nontoxic, said Scott Anderson, a senior adviser for the Environmental Defense Fund.

Fracking, short for hydraulic fracturing, has made it possible to tap into energy reserves across the nation but also has raised concerns about pollution, since large volumes of water, along with sand and hazardous chemicals, are injected deep into the ground to free the oil and gas from rock.

Regulators contend that overall, water- and air- pollution problems are rare, but environmental groups and some scientists say there hasn’t been enough research on those issues. The industry and many federal and state officials say the practice is safe when done properly, but faulty wells and accidents have caused problems.

Halliburton says CleanStim will provide “an extra margin of safety to people, animals and the environment in the unlikely occurrence of an incident” at a drilling site.

Gardiner said Halliburton has developed a chemistry- scoring system for the fluids, with lower scores being better. CleanStim has a zero score, he said, and is “relatively more expensive” than many traditional fracking fluids.

Both Jugovic and Anderson noted that one of the most highly publicized concerns about toxic fracking fluids hasn’t really been an issue: the suggestion that they might migrate from thousands of feet underground, up to drinking- water aquifers.

“Most people agree there are no confirmed cases so far” of fracking chemicals migrating up to drinking water, Anderson said. But he added that simple spills of fluid on the surface can cause problems.

“The most likely of exposure is not from the fracking itself. It is from spills before the fracking fluid is injected,” Anderson said.

There may be technical and cost issues that limit the acceptance of products such as CleanStim. There is tremendous variation in the type of shale rock in different parts of the country.

For example, drillers use different fluids even within the same state, and the specific mix can play a large role in determining how productive a well is.


Comments

1Bigben(1996 comments)posted 1 year, 7 months ago

Lip service.

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2YtownSports(228 comments)posted 1 year, 7 months ago

Problem. Fresh water used can't currently be purified. Where do we get more fresh water?

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3cambridge(3010 comments)posted 1 year, 7 months ago

So if they are "trying" to develop non toxic chemicals one would assume that they are currently using toxic chemicals. Fresh water is not a concern, protect that pipe at all cost. Any minute now you will be reading a post from uticashill how big oil and gas can do whatever they want because there are profits to be made and that trumps the environment every time.

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4RobX(59 comments)posted 1 year, 7 months ago

@YtownSports: "Fresh water can't be purified"? Fresh water falls from the sky! And NE Ohio has more of it than most areas of the US. Fracking would use only a couple percent of the water already used by industry.

@cambridge: Yes, the chemicals used in fracking are somewhat toxic. So is the aspirin in your medicine cabinet and the soap in your sink. None of the three are as toxic as the thousands of gallons of fuel spilled by the tanker this weekend, or at 711 last year, or by drivers every day.

But the frackophobes don't protest the use of cars and trucks. They look the other way at those spills. They protest fracking because of imaginary spills.

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5theoldwrench(243 comments)posted 1 year, 7 months ago

And the gulf spill was only a couple barrels and was Obama's fault.

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