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LAPD to officers: Buckle up



Published: Thu, December 12, 2013 @ 12:00 a.m.

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES

If you’ve ever been pulled over by a police officer for not wearing a seat belt, there’s a decent chance the officer also wasn’t buckled up, either.

Though 86 percent of Americans now wear seat belts, an upcoming study that will be published by California’s Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training estimates that roughly half of law-enforcement officers don’t wear them.

With traffic-related fatalities the leading cause of death of officers on duty, departments nationwide are buckling down to get officers to buckle up.

“Something that can save a person’s life should be on a high priority of being enforced,” said Richard Ashton, a former police chief who has studied officer safety for more than a decade with the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

The Los Angeles Police Department has a new seatbelt education effort after Inspector General Alex Bustamante found that up to 37 percent of officers involved in accidents in 2012 weren’t wearing seat belts.

State laws mandating seatbelt use often exclude police, but the LAPD and most other departments require them in all but certain circumstances.

The costs of not doing so are clear.

In 14 of the past 15 years, it wasn’t a shooting, but a traffic incident that was the leading cause of officer deaths, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Of the 733 law-enforcement officers killed in a vehicle accident from 1980 through 2008, 42 percent weren’t wearing seat belts.

New recruits grew up wearing seat belts, but often don’t on the force because senior officers don’t use them. Some cut old ones off cars and buckle them in to disable the alarm, belt them out of the way, or cut them out entirely.

Part of the problem is blamed on what experts call the myth of a “ninja assassin,” an assailant whose ambush attack would leave officers vulnerable because their seat belts would interfere with their ability to get their gun.


Comments

1dmacker(338 comments)posted 1 year ago

"Part of the problem is blamed on what experts call the myth of a “ninja assassin,” an assailant whose ambush attack would leave officers vulnerable because their seat belts would interfere with their ability to get their gun".
Not such a myth to officers of the Youngstown Police Department where one of their own was assassinated while sitting behind the wheel of a stopped police car.

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