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School report cards show mixed results for Valley schools



Published: Fri, August 23, 2013 @ 12:09 a.m.

NEW GRADING SYSTEM SHOWS MIXED RESULTS FOR VALLEY DISTRICTS

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School Report Card

2012 - 2013 School Report Card

By Denise Dick

denise_dick@vindy.com

The latest state school report cards are supposed to give parents, educators and the general public a clearer picture of how schools are doing, but some Mahoning Valley superintendents believe it makes it more difficult to understand.

“This represents a big change in the way we deter- mine how well our schools are educating our boys and girls,” Richard Ross, state superintendent of public instruction, said Thursday. “Our goal is to create transparency for our customers.”

Rather than the system of designations from “excellent with distinction” to “academic emergency,” the new system uses an A-F grading system.

But because the new system is being phased in, there’s no overall grade for schools or districts.

Ross said the old system concealed areas where schools were doing a poor job.

No district in the state earned all A’s and none received all F’s, the state superintendent said. The new system is intended to show schools and the public the strengths and weaknesses of each school and district.

In the Mahoning Valley, the results were mixed. Canfield, for example, racked up all A’s and B’s, while Poland got four A’s, a B, two C’s, a D and an F. Canfield was designated “excellent” last year, and Poland was “excellent with distinction.”

Those superintendents couldn’t be reached for comments.

The continual changes to the system and the targets schools and districts must hit present challenges, said Liberty schools Superintendent Stan Watson.

“This is a game where the rules weren’t defined at the start of the season,” he said. “It’s tremendously frustrating. The targets continue to move. You just get your focus narrowed and you get zeroed in where you think you need to be, and the target changes. It happens continuously. If it made it simpler for the average person to understand, that would be one thing; but I think you’d be hard-pressed to argue that this is simpler.”

The state graded each district in nine components: performance indicators, performance index, overall value added, valued added for gifted, value added for students with disabilities, value added for the lowest 20 percent of students, four- and five-year graduation rates and annual measurable objectives.

Performance indicators measure the level of achievement for each student in a grade and subject.

Performance index measures the achievement of every student, not just whether they reach proficiency.

Four-year graduation rate includes those students who earn a diploma within four years of entering ninth grade for the first time.

Five-year graduation rate includes those students who graduate within five years of entering ninth grade for the first time.

Value added — all students measures whether or not a school or district met a year’s growth for all students.

Value added — gifted measures whether a year’s growth was met for students gifted in math, reading or superior cognitive ability.

Value added — students with disabilities measures whether a year’s growth has been met for students who have an Individual Education Plan and who take the Ohio Achievement Assessment.

Value added — lowest 20 percent of achievement measures whether a year’s growth has been met for students in the lowest 20 percent based on distribution of scores for the state.

Annual measurable objectives measure the academic performance in reading, math and graduation rates among specific racial and demographic subgroups ranging from minority students to those who are economically disadvantaged.

Liberty schools, designated “excellent” on last year’s report card, earned one A, four B’s, a C, a D and an F this year. The F was in annual measurable objectives.

Watson said the higher grades in the value added categories show that students are continuing to achieve a year’s growth. The district needs to focus more attention on the subgroups, he said.

Austintown, which received the highest rating of “excellent with distinction” on last year’s report card, saw four B’s, two D’s and three F’s.

“We didn’t change what we’re doing,” said Austintown Superintendent Vince Colaluca. “The report cards changed. We still have great kids, and we’re still doing great things in our school system.”

The state not only raised the targets for racial and demographic subgroups, it also eliminated some of the provisions that had allowed the district to earn credit for improvement for some students, he said.

“The system is changing, and we’ll change along with it,” Colaluca said.

The district met 20 of 24 performance indicators.

“We’re very proud of that,” he said.

Youngstown, which was in “academic watch” last year, earned five F’s, two D’s and two C’s this year.

“We made some progress,” said Superintendent Connie Hathorn.

He said he’s not happy with the latest results and is still reviewing the data.

“The data gives us something to look at — and that’s a good thing,” Hathorn said.

The report cards were supposed to be available in interactive form on the Ohio Department of Education website, but the site crashed throughout the day — a problem that the department attributed to heavy traffic.

Some districts weren’t even able to access their data.

Boardman was designated “excellent” last year, and this year, the district earned an A, five B’s and three C’s.

“I think the intention of ODE is a good one,” said Boardman Superintendent Frank Lazzeri. “They want parents to better understand how their schools are doing. The other designations were difficult for people to understand. Everyone understands A, B, C, D and F. It’s a step in the right direction in terms of understanding the data.”

He hopes the ODE provides a guide for parents to explain the new system. Lazzeri wasn’t able to access his own district’s data from the ODE website Thursday.

As the start of school draws near, each day that the district can examine the data to determine strengths and weaknesses and decide how to proceed matters, he said.


Comments

1mnascar(36 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

Can't expect the students to get good grades when the system itself gets 5 F's. Nice job. I'm very proud to say I am a product of the Youngstown School System! They must need more money and a new contract to improve their scores. We sure pay for non preformance. The system should be ashamed of itself. Teachers and administrators! Get less pay more! I'm sure everyone in the system will have an excuse. They are improving. Let's raise our property taxes to reward them.

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2theotherside(333 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

This is nothing more than "edubable" designed to sway public opinion against the public schools. The ALEC puppet masters holding the strings of the privatization corporate interests in control of state government, including Kasich's stooge Ross at the Ohio Department of Education, have a vested interest in enriching their charter school and private school pals and campaign contributors by diverting public school education dollars to those charters and private schools. None of this nonsense has any bearing on authentic learning in the schools and has been proven in research to not mean a thing in terms of authentic learning. Wake up Ohio and consider the real motivation for labeling the public schools as "failing".

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3lizhill2(7 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

What kind of measures are these, if the superintendents and principals don't even understand the grading system? Districts that were formerly excellent with distinction getting F's, in one year? Something is very wrong. I salute all the teachers who show up every day and try to meet these "goals" while working with actual live children in the classroom. Thank you ALL for your persistence.

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4DwightK(1256 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

This is useless. If we can't understand what the school systems are being measured on, how can we trust the grades received?

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5AtownParent(562 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

I am not sure what the problem is with understanding these grades and if you are in the schools, then you know exactly what these things are reporting. Austintown has a good 4-yr and 5yr graduation rate, and they meet the performance indicators, but from year to year there is not a lot of improvement in ability of kids. So basically, a gifted kid doesn't grow his scores, the lowest 20% remain in the lowest 20% and the average kid stays average. Sounds about right with what I have seen.

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6southsidedave(4780 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

Some brainiac who gets paid an obscene amount of money no doubt devised this useless 'grading" system...ha ha ha

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7fd6636(255 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

another republicjerk ploy to discredit public schools, and "sway" thinking to privates and charters. How can a school system be scored as excellent with distinction, and next year have "f"s? All Bull sh$t!!!

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8oakmont(1 comment)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

Great my son will get bumped out of his honors classes again this year!!!! They need him and others like him to bring up the kids from open enrollment!!! Austintown schools have just sunk since we started that crap. Im so glad I only have a few more years left with this drowning school!!! Its not the teachers fault . My son had a class last year that was so out of control that he learned nothing the whole year!! My other two children had a great high school career at Fitch. We can thank Vince and the school board for just flushing Fitch down the toilet!!!! The report card shows it!!!!!!

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9valleymom(38 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

Where'd you go to school? That's the worst run-on sentence I've seen in a while. Don't blame the teachers when these kids get NO support from home. They can't work miracles in a few hours a day.

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10theotherside(333 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

handymandave is an example of one of the problems with those idiotic report cards. He draws the wrong conclusions about something he knows nothing about.

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11kurtw(864 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

Telling comment from Oakmont- "My son had a class last year that was so out of control he learned nothing the whole year."

That was something that would not have happened when I attended Fitch (in the 60's). There was genuine respect- sometimes fear- of our teachers then- chronic troublemakers didn't stand a chance in those days- they were kicked out for the good of the students who wanted to learn- and that's they way it should be now. Nowadays teachers are too imbued by notions of "political correctness" and are too afraid of injuring their students "delicate" psyches by establishing rules- and expecting obedience- that the entire class suffers; and of course "corporal punishment"- absolutely forbidden- if a teacher tried paddling a student nowadays, they would probably get fired and most likely be sued by one of the "concerned" parents (even though that paddling might have greater educational value than most of the watered down left-wing rubbish they teach nowadays).

What happened to our Schools? Ask the Union that runs them- the NEA with their warped values. What happened to Our Country? Ask the Liberal-criminal Conspiracy- with their warped values- running it.

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12SAVEOURCOUNTRY(470 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

kurtw,
don't blame the teachers union. Its the policy makers in each district that is to blame, UNIONS have no control there buddy!!!!
I wish they did and public education would be much like it was as you said (back in the 60's)!!!!!!!!!!

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13theotherside(333 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

So kurtw, let me get this straight. You think teachers don't discipline students because they are trying to be politically correct? Not that school discipline policies are made by boards and administrators and carried out by teachers? Yet, you agree that teachers would get fired for disciplining students and understand why they don't paddle? And somehow in your mind, this is the unions fault? All I can say is wow.

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14kurtw(864 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

Well, all right, my thinking is a "work in progress"- I have an idea and give it to the world and, sometimes, it rises like a butterfly and sometimes it gets stomped into the mud.

Maybe, I have it wrong about the NEA- maybe its the local school Boards that are to blame and I have to start attacking them.

Back to the drawing board...

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15theotherside(333 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

Good of you to admit when you are wrong kurtw. But the fact remains that you felt compelled to slam people for things you were wrong about, and didn't know anything about. In many ways, that is a bigger shame. And by the way, the "...left-wing rubbish they teach nowadays)..." is actually more controlled by the the right wing extremists running state government . Like John Kasich and his statehouse and ODE enablers. Turn off the talk radio and try thinking for yourself.

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16SAVEOURCOUNTRY(470 comments)posted 1 year, 1 month ago

With this new grading system. A school district that has 100 percent passage on tests year in and year out, 100 percent graduate from colleges and become doctors, lawyers, business executives, etc, etc, etc will be a poor rated school. Why? Because they have shown no growth. Wake up public, it's a way to use your tax dollars for some business persons fat paycheck.

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