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US loans from China at issue



Published: Tue, April 30, 2013 @ 12:00 a.m.

Associated Press

WASHINGTON

Despite what you may have heard, China isn’t the country’s biggest creditor. America is.

The bulk of the national debt — soon to exceed a staggering $17 trillion — is held by the Federal Reserve, Social Security system, various pension plans for civil- service workers and military personnel, U.S. banks, mutual funds, private pension plans, insurance companies and individual domestic investors.

China is responsible for just a shade over 7 percent of that total debt. And though it remains the single largest foreign lender (just ahead of Japan), China’s been slowly trimming its holdings, down from nearly 10 percent a few years ago. Overall, all foreign investors — including national central banks — account for roughly one-third of the total outstanding federal government debt.

Also, China suddenly is having debt problems of its own. Heavy recent lending by its banks comes as the recovery in the world’s second-largest economy seems to be stalling. The export giant posted a rare trade deficit in March.

The national debt soon will be front-and-center again as a deeply divided Congress wrestles with an expected new Obama administration request to increase the government’s borrowing authority, the legislatively set debt ceiling. The higher limit would not authorize borrowing for new spending but just enables the government to pay all the bills already racked up.

The upcoming summer debate could be a repeat of the divisive debt-ceiling crisis in August 2011 when weeks of political irresolution nearly plunged the U.S. into its first financial default — and did trigger a downgrade in the government’s once-sterling credit rating.

Congressional leaders already are drawing lines in the sand for the next big fiscal fight. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, has said the only way the GOP-led House will go along with raising the country’s borrowing ceiling was if President Barack Obama and the Democrats came up with a “dollar-for-dollar” amount in budget cuts.

Yet despite China’s relatively shrinking share of the U.S. debt, it continues to be the top poster child for financing America’s deficit-spending habit, a favorite target for politicians in both parties.

It’s not as if U.S. leaders approach China’s bankers extending a tin cup and begging for loans. The Chinese government does what many individual investors do — it simply buys and holds widely available U.S. Treasury bills, bonds and notes.


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