facebooktwitterRSS
- Advertisement -
  • Most Commentedmost commented up
  • Most Emailedmost emailed up
  • Popularmost popular up
- Advertisement -
 

« News Home

Housing, education help available



Published: Mon, April 1, 2013 @ 12:00 a.m.

Valley young people beat the odds, start paths toward success

v Many who age out of in-home care end up poor, in jail, pregnant, homeless

By William K. Alcorn

alcorn@vindy.com

YOUNGSTOWN

1111A higher percentage suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder than do Vietnam War veterans.

But some young adults in Mahoning and Trumbull counties who have grown too old for the foster-care system are managing to survive and even thrive. They’ve done so with persistence, effort, positive attitudes and the help of caring foster parents, counselors and government programs.

Meet Cameo Komsie, 18; Jawan Johnson, 19; Latrelle Stanford, 19; and Jasmine Rose Hardy, 23.

Komsie is a senior at Campbell Memorial High School working at a McDonald’s restaurant. She plans to study graphic-design management and wants to start her own business someday.

Johnson plans to attend Eastern Gateway Community College for two years and finish his degree at Youngstown State University.

Stanford is a full-time freshman at YSU studying gerontology.

Hardy is scheduled to graduate this fall from YSU with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. She plans a career in law enforcement.

Komsie’s story

She lived alternately with her mother and father before entering custody of Trumbull County Children Services. She lived in two group homes and then went into foster care for two years.

Now out of foster care for several months, she is determined to be a good parent and “always be there for people and not throw them under the bus.”

“My mom did her best. She’s my mom, and we keep in contact, but we definitely do not see eye to eye,” she said.

Komsie, who does not have a relationship with her siblings, lives in an apartment funded through a government program and is making plans to go to graphic-design school when she graduates from high school.

“I have been planning. I like to plan ahead,” she said.

Johnson’s story

He went from home to home, sometimes staying with his mother or brother, until the Mahoning County Children Services took custody after which he lived in group homes.

He said he doesn’t have a relationship with his parents.

“We’re on totally different tracks. I do not talk to any members of my family,” he said.

Johnson said he had trust issues when he first came to CSB.

“I thought, if you can’t trust family, how can I trust these people? But they taught me life skills and how to trust. When I emancipated, I went with friends of the family,” he said.

“Going through everything opened my eyes. When people say they have been mistreated, I can relate. I instantly feel it. It makes me want to help and motivate people like myself,” he said.

Stanford’s story

Mahoning County CSB took custody of her at 5, and she was in foster care from 7 to 14. She lived in a group home for two years, and then went back in foster care when she was a junior in high school.

“I was very young ... and kind of confused when I went into foster care, but it went really smoothly. I stayed with the same foster mom for seven years. I give her a lot of credit,” Stanford said.

She said she liked the group-home experience because it taught her to be more independent.

“I had to do chores and had a good support system. And even though I’ve aged out, CSB continues to be available if I need it,” she said.

Hardy’s story

She stayed in a group home for a day before going into the only foster home she had. She she still goes to her foster mother for help and to talk.

“Foster care helped shape me into the person I am. It helped me to see how great God is and helped me to help other youth,” she said.

Hardy, who said she is working to build relationships with her siblings, said several things got her to where she is in college. But, she said, the most important of those things are her Bible-study group and the Scripture in Philippians 4:13, which says: “I can do all this through him who gives me strength.”

“When I want to give up, I remember it is not for me but for Christ that I am here to be a voice and light for youth in and out of care,” Hardy said.

Available to help aged-out foster-care young adults are counselors, case managers and advisers from Mahoning and Trumbull County Children Services agencies; other agencies; and several local, state and federal programs specifically to help them make the transition a little easier from foster care to being on their own.

Jeff Phillips, independent-living coordinator for Mahoning County CSB, said he and Cynthia Berend, a CSB caseworker, prepare the foster-care graduates to live on their own by linking them to services such as housing, job training and education.

The private sector also gets involved. For instance, Al Casanta of Home Buyer Funding in Boardman, renovated 26 apartment units on Bryson Street on Youngstown’s North Side. All but three are occupied by college students, including foster-care graduates.

“I like working with people and being around kids, and I’m impressed by Jeff [Phillips] and Jawan [Johnson],” who was his security guard, Casanta said. “It’s been a great experience for myself and my partners. We’re very happy with it.”


Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.


News
Opinion
Entertainment
Sports
Marketplace
Classifieds
Records
Discussions
Community
Help
Forms
Neighbors

HomeTerms of UsePrivacy StatementAdvertiseStaff DirectoryHelp
© 2014 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator.
107 Vindicator Square. Youngstown, OH 44503

Phone Main: 330.747.1471 • Interactive Advertising: 330.740.2955 • Classified Advertising: 330.746.6565
Sponsored Links: Vindy Wheels | Vindy Jobs | Vindy Homes