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Citizens urged to stop privatizing public education



Published: Mon, May 7, 2012 @ 9:06 p.m.

Citizens urged to stop privatizing public education

BOARDMAN

To stop privatization of public education, citizens need to become active.

“Go to hearings, send 10 million emails to the governor and the legislators,” William L. Phillis, executive director of the Ohio Coalition for Equity and Adequacy of School Funding, told about 200 people at Boardman High School Monday.

Phillis was a speaker at a public forum sponsored by township schools and the Mahoning County Educational Service Center.

Chief topics were charter schools and vouchers, both of which take money from public school districts, presenters said.

Nearly $780 million in state funding went to charter schools in fiscal year 2012 including $21 million from Youngstown, $696,000 from Austintown and $683,000 from Boardman school districts.

Even though the Ohio Supreme Court has declared the state’s school funding system unconstitutional because it relies too heavily on local property taxes, the system remains in place.

Steve Dyer, Education Policy Fellow at Innovation Ohio, pointed out that while state funding for traditional public schools in Ohio has decreased, it’s increased for charter schools — even though more than half of the former earn at least an A on state report cards, compared to nearly half of charter schools in Ohio earning D’s or F’s on the report card.

Public schools have to either cut programs or seek property tax increases to make up the difference, Dyer said.

Read more on Vindy.com and in Tuesday’s Vindicator.


Comments

1Ytownnative(985 comments)posted 1 year, 11 months ago

so we should reward the substandard school systems in the area?

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2NachoCheese(160 comments)posted 1 year, 11 months ago

Get the unions out of the public schools, or they are doomed to failure - plain and simple! School systems should stand or fall on their own MERITS, not becuase the government forces substandard products on the citizens.

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3Education_Voter(816 comments)posted 1 year, 11 months ago

No guys.
It's not about "rewards". It's about providing a service in a sustainable way.
You should have gone to the meeting. Handing over millions of dollars of funding to private enterprises with political connections...and then finding out that the good ol' public school got better results? Priceless.

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4lajoci(86 comments)posted 1 year, 11 months ago

The whole charter schools movement is a scam, a scheme to get public dollars into the pockets of the well-connected, private business cronies of elected officials.

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5JME(801 comments)posted 1 year, 11 months ago

"good ol' public school got better results? Priceless."

Sounds like there are some bitter teachers out there who don't want to change, or admit there is a problem:

"Ohio’s No. 1 elementary school succeeds in an area better known for hardship"

"Last year, every third- and fourth-grade student at Wells passed state assessments in math and reading, and more than 70 percent performed at “advanced” levels. The school has earned a 100 percent mark on the tests every year since 2006 after falling just short in a few previous years."

"More than half the students come from poor households, but the trappings of high unemployment and poverty have not slowed them in school"

"
there is little debate about its effectiveness, which is supported by the banners of school awards hanging above the door to the office: National Title I Distinguished School Award 2009, Education Trust Dispelling the Myth Award 2008, National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence, 2003-04 and 2004-05."

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stori...

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6JME(801 comments)posted 1 year, 11 months ago

Since sustainability was brought up:

"And, last year, the district was recognized for being among the most efficient in the state. Spending just $535.31 per student on administrative costs, Steubenville shelled out the least among small, high-poverty urban schools, which average $1,877.62, according to the analysis by Ohio Education Matters."

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stori...

NOW THAT IS PRICELESS!

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