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Boomers strain to gain foothold in new economy



Published: Mon, March 26, 2012 @ 12:08 a.m.

Second in a three-day series

By KATE GIAMMARISE

The Blade

TOLEDO

Baby boomers have been a demographic group long associated with cultural and personal changes.

But as many boomers have lost their jobs and faced long-term unemployment in the Great Recession, career change has been difficult.

Jack Frech, director of Athens County Job and Family Services in southeastern Ohio, said he often sees firsthand unemployed baby boomers having a hard time with a career transition.

“They’re working at fast-food places, restaurants, waiting tables, they’re working in retail,” he said. “It’s very tough out there.”

Frech’s observation is correct, studies say. Older workers — age 55 and above — have the lowest re-employment rate of any demographic group, according to a research paper released last year by the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University. Though workers of all ages have been impacted by the Great Recession, older workers have fared especially poorly, the Heldrich Center found.

These workers tend to remain out of work longer, are less likely to be re-employed, and tend to experience sharper declines in wages than younger workers when they do find new jobs.

While 7 in 10 out-of-work older workers reported they considered changing their careers to find a new job, only 12 percent enrolled in training for that purpose, the researchers found.

Why?

The answer: Reluctance to change careers before connecting with another employer in their industry and lack of funds to pay for the costs of education and training, according to The Blade newspaper of Toledo.

Bill Turner, work-force administrator for the Trumbull County Department of Job and Family Services, said his agency sees a mix of people who do and don’t want to change fields.

Many people must first deal with the initial shock and trauma of losing a job and stabilize their life and finances before they figure out their next step, such as a new career field, he said.

Frech believes many older workers end up in service jobs rather than retooling for a new career because of the expense of education. By contrast, a service job fulfills the immediate need for income and fits with many boomers’ ability to work hard.

“They have a good work ethic. They show up. They follow orders,” he said.

The Heldrich Center study notes the current unemployment system is not well-suited to address the problems of older workers in a prolonged recession who “may need to undertake long-term — and expensive — retraining programs in order to find another job.”

The study suggests linking unemployment payments with education and retraining services for workers who are too young or financially unable to retire. “Without additional assistance, millions of older workers will be left behind when the economy recovers and will suffer continued financial crises,” according to the study.

The baby boomers James Ford sees tend to fall into one of three categories: people fearful of a career change, those eager to make a change or those who must make a career change because they have no other option.

The last category of workers often is forced to take whatever low-wage job they can find. Ford, deputy director of Ross County Department of Job and Family Services in southern Ohio, said many laid-off older workers don’t end up changing careers because the idea is simply too daunting or they fear that employers won’t hire them because of their age.

When older displaced workers do find jobs, they typically experience sharp wage declines, according to a policy paper released last year by the Urban Institute, based in Washington, D.C.

But Joe Catalano, who coordinates the employment ministry at Blessed John XXIII parish in Perrysburg, outside of Toledo, said many of the laid-off professionals he assisted didn’t need to retrain for a new field, they just needed to improve their r sum writing, networking and job-search skills. With the notable exception of some people who had worked in the auto industry, most didn’t want to change fields, he said.

But for others, learning a new skill or earning another credential is a necessity.

Doris Beach is employment and training coordinator at Experience Works in Toledo, a national organization that helps older adults find jobs.

She encourages the clients she works with to retrain and learn new skills. Some of the job-seekers she works with are learning to install security systems, training to drive trucks or forklifts and getting certified to be early-childhood educators or nurses’ aides.

“I don’t see changing careers as a problem for baby boomers,” said Beach, 74. “They have a work ethic — whatever it takes to get the job done.”

A recent brief from the National Employment Law Project also noted some older workers are considering or have already taken up the ultimate career change — early retirement.

“[W]ith such limited job prospects for older unemployed workers, forced early retirement seems a more likely possibility for many. In fact, two-thirds of older respondents [in a recent survey] had taken up Social Security or planned to do so as soon as they are eligible,” according to NELP.

Are boomers, who came of age in the era of upheaval in the 1960s and ’70s, more able to adapt and change?

Turner isn’t sure. “Those of us that came through the ’60s and ’70s, we were pushing for change, but for lack of a better term, I guess we all got civilized,” he said with a laugh. In the end, “people do what they have to do,” he said.

Beach added, “They’re living longer, they’re educated, and most of them want to continue to contribute. You can’t just count them out.”


Comments

1iBuck(214 comments)posted 2 years, 5 months ago

It has nothing to do with reluctance to re-tool. It's lack of funds to re-tool. If someone already has a bachelor's, master's or PhD in a hard science, engineering, or computer science, and needs to re-tool, it is going to be very expensive.

If someone has been -- e.g. developing computer-aided engineering software, designing highways or sky-scrapers using CAD/CAM/CAE tools, doing biophysics research, developing operating systems or software development tools -- it's not as though he can go to the juco for a 10-week "elementary introductory key-boarding" class and that will miraculously land him a solid long-term job that will support the family and put the children through their degrees.

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2busyman(239 comments)posted 2 years, 5 months ago

A lot of baby boomers, not all, are set in their ways from past jobs. Many of us came up working Monday thru Friday and enjoy the weekends off. The ecomony that has move way from manufacturing towards services that operates on a 24/7 schedule. We are too tired work the 50 to 60 hour work week that many of the young people can do. This is why alot of autoworkers took their retirement in their 50's. You can not stand on your feet at 50 as you could a 25. That is a fact. Most workers in their 50 and 60 are usually at the experienced level of their manufacturng life cycle. They are holding down positions in Inpection, Quality, shipping and receiving. Most have conditions that that limit their movement or lifting abilities. It is best for the baby boomers to work at contract jobs or start their own business. It is also a lot more expensive to carry the boomer on health care plans if hired at all. It is a catch 22 situation.

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