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Faculty union, administration reach a tentative agreement



Published: Thu, September 29, 2011 @ 12:03 a.m.

By Denise Dick

denise_dick@vindy.com

Youngstown

Youngstown State University has reached a tentative agreement with its faculty union, less than a week after settling with its classified employees union.

YSU administration and its chapter of the Ohio Education Association reached a tentative agreement after meeting Wednesday and resolving remaining contract provisions.

“The faculty union and the YSU Board of Trustees will schedule meetings to review and ratify the tentative agreement,” the union and administration said in a joint statement. “Details of the agreement will not be publicly released until after the votes.”

Ron Cole, university spokesman, declined additional comment.

Sherry Linkon, spokeswoman for the union, said YSU-OEA is working to schedule meetings for early next week.

Last week, the university reached a tentative agreement with the Association of Classified Employees. Union members are to vote on that pact Monday. No details have been released about the ACE agreement either.

Negotiations with the faculty began in February, and unresolved issues went through the fact-finder process.

Last month, the union accepted the fact-finder’s report, but YSU trustees rejected it.

Both sides then returned to the table before the university issued its last, best offer which called for no raises the first two years with a 2 percent raise the third and final year of the contract.

It also included increased health- care contributions of 10 percent, 12 percent and 15 percent in the first, second and third years, respectively, and a reduction in the pay faculty receive for summer school.

Union members rejected that offer Aug. 25 and initially announced they would strike.

A few hours later, though, they changed course, opting against a strike in favor of returning to talks.

One issue upon which the two sides disagreed was health care. Union members had wanted to know the amount of the premium in the second and third years of the agreement, something the university said it couldn’t predict.


Comments

1jethead11(139 comments)posted 2 years, 11 months ago

YSU students take notice. The union was going to strike and inconvenience you, which would have withheld your student aid, and possibly destroyed your graduation plans. But they changed their minds when the union bosses realized it may affect the SB5 vote. Not because they love their students, but because it would hurt their chances to get what they want in November.

What is to learn here? That the public sector does not need to have the right to strike in order to get what they want. Whether you like SB5 or not, whether you like the governor or not, they saved you a lot of inconvenience, money and pain, and the faculty will still get what they need. They won't need food stamps or have to live under a bridge. When you reign in greed, in this case union greed, everyone wins.

Consider voting yes on the SB5 vote in November. You have already been helped by it. And the world didn't end thanks to it.

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2SAVEOURCOUNTRY(470 comments)posted 2 years, 11 months ago

Public sector workers rise up. If SB5 passes, every last one of you need to resign your post at the end of your current contract. It will be impossible to replace the quality of service lost by this move. Plus, companies will love the expreience they have to choose from nearly a half a million people entering the work force for higher paying jobs in the private sector.
You'll all need higher wages to pay for the increase in insurance you'll be paying when there is no more quality police or fire protection as weel as CHARTER SCHOOL unlicienced teachers left.

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3jethead11(139 comments)posted 2 years, 11 months ago

saveourcountry: It sounds like you are advocating a liberal temper tantrum. The fact of the matter is very few public employees will leave their post after SB5 becomes law. If they do, best of luck to them. Many are working in the public sector out of a feeling of duty to the community. They will not leave and will continue to be well compensated. Others are doing it for the type of job, hours, or other reason. They too will not leave. If they plan to stay in Youngstown, I am not sure where they would get a private sector job from, but I guess they could look.

Once the union temper tantrums are over, and public sector employees survive and even thrive in the new world they will be in, life will return to a better "normal". And Ohio will be a much stronger state because of it.

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4Militarymom2(6 comments)posted 2 years, 11 months ago

Why would anyone want people to vote to have any more rights taken away from the American people? Any part of the American people. It won't better "normal". ... and someday you'll be affected negatively when it hit's home for you.

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