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St. E’s plans farmers markets in Youngstown, Boardman



Published: Sun, May 22, 2011 @ 12:03 a.m.

Staff report

YOUNGSTOWN

The staff at St. Elizabeth Health Center on Belmont Avenue will host a farmers market from 10:45 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday. Its aim is to bring better health to its patients.

The program will be in the hospital’s second-floor private dining rooms.

More and more people are asking the question, “Where does my food come from?” A movement is sweeping the country to grow and eat local produce, meat and poultry.

Humility of Mary Health Partners is joining that movement with a commitment to join a developing cooperative — the Lake-to-River Food Cooperative.

A cooperative is a group of people who own the business designed to serve member needs, with proceeds going back to the members. Members of a food cooperative include growers and institutional buyers such as hospitals and schools.

Several local farmers will have produce and meat available for sale to staff and visitors. Food served in the hospital cafeteria that day will include locally grown lettuce on the salad bar and hamburgers from locally grown beef.

Jim Converse, manager of the Northside Farmers Market, and his wife, Pat Rosenthal, are behind the Lake-to-River Food Cooperative.

“We’re sure to have several varieties of lettuce, radishes, asparagus, rhubarb, sugar snap peas and spinach. We may even have some strawberries,” Converse said.

An article in Entrepreneurial Farming states: “A ‘quiet revolution’ is occurring across the nation regarding food production and consumption, and northeast Ohio is on the leading edge of that movement.”

Melissa Scattino, director of nutrition services for HMHP, said more farmers markets are planned at St. Elizabeth here and St. Elizabeth Boardman Health Center. She said these will take place outdoors this summer and fall.


Comments

1severthis(42 comments)posted 3 years, 3 months ago

Bravo! Hospitals, retirement communities, schools, and restaurants should all be participating in this due-diligence. Processed foods are not only lacking in nutritional value, the chemicals used in the process can be harmful over time. As institutions of health, well-being, education, and nutritional 'expertise" begin to walk the talk, perhaps the next generation will not be nutritionally illiterate and not be cursed with obesity and it's related problems. BTW -- iceburg lettuce: fiber, water, little to no nutritional value. $10 for a nice big bowl of that stuff at you favorite restaurant. Shameful.

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