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RIDDLED ROADWAYS



Published: Tue, March 8, 2011 @ 12:01 a.m.
  Lyon Blvd. Potholes

Lyon Blvd. in Poland Twp. is riddled with potholes. One resident describes the street as a war zone.

Lyon Blvd. in Poland Twp. is riddled with potholes. One resident describes the street as a war zone.

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The Vindicator (Youngstown)

A woman walks her dog on Lyon Boulevard. The Poland Township road is riddled with potholes, and the Mahoning County Engineer’s Office plans to improve the road this summer.

photo

The Vindicator (Youngstown)

Drivers on Walker Mill Road in Boardman Township slow to a crawl as they maneuver to avoid hitting potholes.

Clamor over potholes floods engineer’s office with calls

By Ashley Luthern

aluthern@vindy.com

POLAND

Jeff DeChellis doesn’t just see the potholes on Lyon Boulevard.

He hears them, too.

“We’ll hear cars flying down the road, and it sounds like pieces of their car are flying off,” said DeChellis, who has lived on Lyon for two years.

DeChellis, walking his dog, Bella, on a sidewalk parallel to Lyon, said the only time the road has been smooth this winter was when 6 inches of snow packed into the potholes.

Residents on Lyon live in Poland Township, send their children to Struthers public schools and call Mahoning County with road problems.

And they’ve been calling, said Marilyn Kenner, county chief deputy engineer.

“We’ve gotten lots of complaints,” she said. “... Our office is looking to try to do something to make the road better without having to tear out the whole road and rebuild it from scratch, in an effort to save funds.”

The alternatives would include milling off the asphalt and putting a concrete epoxy on the concrete slabs, or the county could put fabric down and add asphalt on the road, she said.

Although Kenner did not have an exact estimate, she said the project would cost at least $250,000 and start this summer.

With either of those options, cracking would occur, “but at least it will hold the road over for five to eight years until the county gets enough money to” completely overhaul the road, she said.

In 2002, the county put an asphalt overlay on Lyon.

Another county road drawing the ire of residents is Walker Mill, which is in Boardman Township.

“It’s worse right now,” said Bob Johnston, a 26-year resident of Walker Mill.

He said the county “cold-patched [potholes] about three weeks ago, but it’s all blown out now.”

The cold patch is only a temporary solution, Kenner said.

“With the freeze and thaw, it tends to roll out of the pothole. It also falls apart faster than hot patch,” she said.

Hot-mix asphalt becomes available April 15, she added.

This year, Walker Mill is scheduled to have patching, not repaving, Kenner said.

Johnston said it’s been repaved a couple of times since he’s lived there.

“I’d like to see it repaved entirely now,” he said.

Kenner asked for residents’ patience as the weather continues to go through a freeze-thaw cycle.

“Our goal is to patch every road and fill all potholes, but it will take time,” Kenner said.


Comments

1UnionForever(1470 comments)posted 3 years, 4 months ago

The problem is 90% of the engineer's budget is used to pay the high wages and plush benefits for the public employees in the engineer's office instead of fixing the roads. This kind of spending just can't continue. SB5 goes a long way to fixing the problem. That's why I am supporting it.

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2howardinyoungstown(591 comments)posted 3 years, 4 months ago

Those suburbanites in Poland are so whiney. Based on the photograph the asphalt is about 2 inches thick above the mesh and that is the depth of the pot hole. In Youngstown city limits we have to live with some potholes that are 8" to 10" deep; in some places the potholes have grown so large that they join together to form chasms in the roadway 3 to 4 feet long. We also have streets that have been repaved so many times that a curb that used to be 6" to 8" high is reduced to 1" or less in some spots. Check out Oakwood Ave. on the West side from Meridian Rd. to Belle Vista Ave.

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3Freeatlast(1991 comments)posted 3 years, 4 months ago

NO tax money to kix the roads we are broke . Just call the Gov. and tell him

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4JME(801 comments)posted 3 years, 4 months ago

Yea Freeatlast, that tax money must go to the support the over-compensated in the Engineer's department. Keep whining about SB5.

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5ValleyNative(174 comments)posted 3 years, 4 months ago

Man, I drove to Youngstown on Glenwood Ave last week. Boy, that road is garbage! Especially between Fosters and downtown. There truly were parts where I just drove in the middle, turn-only lane. Many others did as well.

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6Cowboyfan(105 comments)posted 3 years, 4 months ago

Unionforever...The last raises that were given were for office people not the people on the street. WKBN had the Union Presidnet on and he said they still have workers laid off. Don't give the raises and bring back the people who do the work.

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7Cowboyfan(105 comments)posted 3 years, 4 months ago

Clingan road has pot holes that can swallow a small car. Poland is not whining they are in bad shape too. I have to go through there every day.

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8ValleyNative(174 comments)posted 3 years, 4 months ago

March = pothole season
May-Rest of year = construction season
July = heat season
Spring = pollen season

Always something to complain about! ;)

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9mark(60 comments)posted 3 years, 4 months ago

What about Wilcox and Fairview Roads? About 6 years ago, the roads were in need of a mill-and-fill. The County came in and poured asphalt down over the existing, hole-riddled surface and ran out of asphalt before the covering could even be completed. Thus, the roads was left for the past 6 years with a large section of the left sides of each lane uncovered and uneven, while the sides have an extra 1/2" layer of asphalt. Regardless, 6 years of deterioration on the road as a whole are visible and felt by every driver.

Every year they come out and cold patch the holes, which lasts all of about 2 days. Today, the road is so badly deteriorated that there are areas in which the holes comprise more of the road surface than actual asphalt. Do they not realize that part of this road is used by heavy semi-trucks entering and leaving Walmart every day? That's a lot of heavy truck traffic and the road needs a base that can sustain that type of use.

It's time to do it right. Strip it down to the sub-base and properly surface the two roads. The citizens of Mahoning County have been waiting for their tax dollars to be used to fill the holes of something other than Mr. Marsico's pockets.

I usually stop by the Engineer's office tent at the Canfield Fair. I spoke with Mr. Marsico and several other engineers over the years. Most of them have no clue about what is going on with county roads. The year that the county was involved in the Firefighters' Memorial Bridge (the "Peanut Bridge") rehab, Mr. Marsico told me himself that the reason it was being painted black (it was being painted red) was because it reduces the effects of weathering and deterioration. Really? I'm just beside myself and I wish somebody would run for that office. Anybody. It is truly disheartening to me that we cannot find a better person in Mahoning County to begin fixing a severely broken, and likely corrupt, engineers office.

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10Traveler(606 comments)posted 3 years, 4 months ago

If in summer they would go around sealing the all the cracks in the road before winter we wouldnt have pot holes like crazy to fix.

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11mark(60 comments)posted 3 years, 4 months ago

Traveler: The extent of cold temperatures, combined with repeated and excessive alternations of rain and snow have contributed to the current condition of the roads that we see now. Crack sealing would have potentially helped a bit, but ultimately it isn't a cure-all. I understand that the county is faced with a difficult situation after a very rough winter weather season. After all, I've seen state routes and local township and city roads in bad condition too. I don't expect them to be able to fix everything now. It is too early in the season for them to really start. What concerns me is that year-after-year, the county neglects some of the most deteriorated roads and when they actually do give them attention they waste tax dollars on poor fixes that they know are temporary like cold patch and that horrible half-surface of New Rd. You can't cut out half of lanes and replace them like that. As is now visible, the newly replaced sections as well as the ignored areas of New Rd between SR46 and Turner Road are awful. It was a complete waste of money that only aided (didn't completely fix) the condition of New Rd in the first place.

Turner Road is next. Between Mahoning Avenue and Fairview there are holes in the northbound lane big enough to swallow up cars and they've persisted for days. Those actually do need some cold patch to hold them over, but I hope and pray that they resurface that 1.5 mile stretch as it will desperately need it. If they don't the damage that will occur through next winter will be so severe that the road (like other county roads currently) will be impassable.

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12walter_sobchak(1847 comments)posted 3 years, 4 months ago

Most of the problems with the roads listed are due to poor shoulders and base that came about years ago when roads were widened. Look at any road that has numerous potholes along the edge and you can usually see the joint where the widening took place. The pounding of the vehicle wheels on the edge causes a depression that prevents runoff into the side dithces. The water collects, sinks in through cracks, freezes, heaves, and is shaved off by plows. The cycle continues. Most of these roads need the edges excavated, compacted, new base material under the pavement, extended out into the shoulders, with complete ditch repair. But, the engineer's dept. proposes to do this to the worst area of Western Reserve Rd. and the public b!tches about it. You can't have it both ways.

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13walter_sobchak(1847 comments)posted 3 years, 4 months ago

Most of the problems with the roads listed are due to poor shoulders and base that came about years ago when roads were widened. Look at any road that has numerous potholes along the edge and you can usually see the joint where the widening took place. The pounding of the vehicle wheels on the edge causes a depression that prevents runoff into the side dithces. The water collects, sinks in through cracks, freezes, heaves, and is shaved off by plows. The cycle continues. Most of these roads need the edges excavated, compacted, new base material under the pavement, extended out into the shoulders, with complete ditch repair. But, the engineer's dept. proposes to do this to the worst area of Western Reserve Rd. and the public b!tches about it. You can't have it both ways.

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14CrestwoodRocks(107 comments)posted 3 years, 4 months ago

It is time for the Stark, Summit and Portage County Engineers to help pitch in with the Trumbull, Mahoning and Columbiana County Engineers. Merging is reccommended

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