facebooktwitterRSS
- Advertisement -
  • Most Commentedmost commented up
  • Most Emailedmost emailed up
  • Popularmost popular up
- Advertisement -
 

« News Home

‘Egad’ will get the audience involved



Published: Thu, February 10, 2011 @ 12:00 a.m.

IF YOU GO

What: “Egad — The Woman in White”

When: 7:30 p.m. Friday,

Saturday and Feb. 18, 19, 25 and 26; and

2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 20 and 27.

Where: Victorian Players Theater, 702 Mahoning Ave., Youngstown

Tickets: Call 330-746-5455

By GUY D’ASTOLFO

dastolfo@vindy.com

YOUNGSTOWN

The Victorian Players will return to its roots with “Egad — The Woman In White.” But with a twist.

The 19th-century melodrama has villains and damsels in distress and is the type of fare that has become a Vic specialty.

The diffference with “Egad,” however, is that it was written in 1975.

“It’s interesting, because most melodramas were written in a period long before our own and were supposed to be serious,” said director Brandon Martin. “‘Egad’ is set in the Victorian Era, but it was written in the ’70s, and it’s supposed to be funny.”

The play was adapted by Tim Kelly and is based on the 1859 novel “The Woman In White” by Wilkie Collins.

“Egad” centers around Sir Percival Glyde, a mustache-twirling villain who will stop at nothing to make money.

It’s a convoluted plot, but it boils down to one thing.

A woman (in white) has escaped from an asylum and is coming after Sir Percival, and he is afraid.

Bill Finley of East Liverpool stars as Sir Percival. Finley earned a Marquee Award for his work in The Vic’s production of “The Heiress” last season.

The cast also includes Monica Beasley-Martin, Audrey Allen, Kim Nevel and Christina Kopcsos.

“There are a few fight scenes, including one big one,” said Martin. “It’s not elaborate sword fighting — it’s for gags. It’s a very funny scene where one villain fights another villain.

Martin also will use “boo-hiss” girls, who will hold up signs to get the audience involved.

And in another nod to Victorian-era theater, audience members will be encouraged to throw ping-pong balls at the villain.

“In Victorian days, people in the audience would throw tomatoes or vegetables at the ones they didn’t like,” said Martin.

Tomatoes would get a little messy, so the theater instead will supply ping-pong balls to attendees.


Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.


News
Opinion
Entertainment
Sports
Marketplace
Classifieds
Records
Discussions
Community
Help
Forms
Neighbors

HomeTerms of UsePrivacy StatementAdvertiseStaff DirectoryHelp
© 2014 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator.
107 Vindicator Square. Youngstown, OH 44503

Phone Main: 330.747.1471 • Interactive Advertising: 330.740.2955 • Classified Advertising: 330.746.6565
Sponsored Links: Vindy Wheels | Vindy Jobs | Vindy Homes