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BLACK HISTORY MONTH | Events



Published: Sat, February 5, 2011 @ 12:00 a.m.

BLACK HISTORY MONTH | Events

Listing of events at Youngstown State University and elsewhere for Black History Month, which is celebrated throughout February:

Today: Noon to 6 p.m., Chestnut Room, Kilcawley Center. The African Marketplace, an opportunity for the public to sample jewelry, writings, goods and creations by African-American and African authors and artists.

Tuesday: 7 p.m., McDonough Museum of Art, Bliss Hall Gallery. Artist Hilton Murray, panel discussion. Murray works in graphic design, television production, advertising and art history and creates architectural structures reflecting a diversity of cityscapes.

Feb. 15: 7:30 p.m., Ohio Room, “Images of Youngstown: Landscapes in film and literature,” lecture by Derrick Jones, a filmmaker and instructor at Bowling Green University.

Feb. 22: 6:30 p.m., The Gallery, Kilcawley Center. African Movie Night with discussion afterward. “Where the Water Meets the Sky” documents the story of women in a remote region of northern Zambia who are taught how to make a film as a way to speak about their experiences in the AIDS epidemic. “White King, Red Rubber and Black Death” portrays King Leopold II, the ruthless Belgian colonialist who ruled the Democratic Republic of Congo as his private property and was responsible for the murder of 20 million Africans.

Feb. 24: 6:30 to 10 p.m., Youngstown Club, 201 E. Commerce St., Youngstown. “An Evening of Jazz” featuring Jeff Green and his band. Tickets are $50 per person and include parking, refreshments and hors d’oeuvres.

Feb. 25: 7 p.m., The Gallery, “Blacks in the Military,” lecture by Yvonne Latty, born and raised in New York City. She is the director of the Reporting New York and Reporting the Nation programs at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at NYU.

Feb. 28: 7 p.m., Ohio Room, “I Question America: The Legacy of Fannie Lou Hamer,” a play by E.P. Mc-Knight, graduate of Fordham University, Lincoln Center, New York.

OTHER EVENTS

Warren: The true-life story of Henry “Box” Brown, the man who mailed himself out of slavery, will be presented through dramatic storytelling, original music and magic at 2 p.m. Feb. 12 at Warren-Trumbull County Public Library, 444 Mahoning Avenue NW. The Black History Month program features Rory Rennick, known as “The Magistic,” who shares the story through a blend of theatrical magic and motivational insight. Brown escaped slavery by mailing himself in a wooden box from Richmond, Va., to Philadelphia in 1849. The program is especially for children age 6 to 12. Registration is not required.

Warren: Kent State University Trumbull Campus, room 202, classroom/administration building, celebrates Black History Month with a variety of activities. Dr. Leslie Heaphy speaks on the Negro Baseball League at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. Heaphy teaches a variety of courses at Kent State University. Professor Mwatabu Okantah will have a poetry reading an lecture at 12:30 p.m. Feb. 15. He is an assistant professor and poet-in-residence in the Department of Pan-African Studies at Kent State University. He will provide commentary pertinent to Black History Month to complement the readings. A question-and-answer session will follow. Dr. George Garrison of KSU will discuss “Africa & Africans in the Early Christian Bible and Early Christianity” at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 23. Before his time at Kent State, Garrison served in the Vietnam War and also taught at a boarding school in the Navajo Indian Nation. This lecture will also identify Africans who were popes in the early Catholic Church. Additionally, Lifeshare will conduct two blood drives from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 21 and 22 near the Classroom/Administration Building. For additional information regarding these events, please contact Jacob Roope at 330-675-8858 or via e-mail at jroope@kent.edu.

Youngstown: Steffon Wydell Jones, local historian and Civil War re-enactor, will present a combined program, “Reflections of Daddyo: George Wydell Jones Jr.” and “The Buffalo Soldiers,” at 2 p.m. Feb. 12 at the Youngstown Center of Industry and Labor (steel museum), 151 W. Wood St. George Wydell Jones Jr. was an original member of the doo-wop group The Edsels in the early 1950s and 1960s. Cost is $4 for adults; $3 for senior citizens; $2 for children. For information, call Steffon Wydell Jones at 330-774-8214.

Youngstown: Beulah Baptist Church, 570 Sherwood Ave. Black History Month theme: “African Americans’ Past to the Present.” Ted Toles will speak about Negro Baseball League at 4 p.m. Feb. 13. The presentation is free.

East Liverpool: The city school district’s second annual Black History Month celebration called “Lest We Forget” will be Feb. 18-19 at the school district administration building, 500 Maryland Ave. The two-day event is sponsored by the Sister to Sister women’s group and the NAACP. Tickets are $25 ($40 for a couple) for one day; or $35 ($55 for a couple) for both days, and must be purchased in advance by calling 330-870-5124. Feb. 18 event begins at 6 p.m. with a reception. A tribute to past and present residents who contributed to the community begins at 7 p.m. The Feb. 19 event begins at 11 a.m. with an African Marketplace. At 3 p.m., Robert Roche of the American Indian Education Center in Cleveland will give a lecture on the American Indian’s role in helping slaves escape to freedom. At 5 p.m., Mary Badham, known for her portrayal of Jean Louise “Scout” Finch in the movie “To Kill a Mockingbird,” will recall her experiences on the film, followed by a question-and-answer period. The day ends at 6:30 p.m. with a musical program.

Youngstown: The Mahoning Shenango Valley Historical Club will have a free black-history program at 3 p.m. Feb. 19 at the main library, 305 Wick Ave.

Youngstown: A representative of the Youngstown unit of the NAACP and Judy Williams of Youngstown, a local historian for the black community, will speak at 10 a.m. Feb. 23 for the Carousel Center at Newport Branch library, 3730 Market St. The center provides several programs for adults who are developmentally disabled. The event is open to the public. The speakers will provide information on local black history, explain how the NAACP was formed, and also describe how the organization serves the public.

Youngstown: Steffon Wydell Jones will have a program on black Civil War soldiers buried at historic Oak Hill Cemetery at 2 p.m. Feb. 26 at the Arms Family Museum, 648 Wick Ave. The cost is $4 for adults; $3 for senior citizens; and $2 for children.

Source: YSU, Warren-Trumbull County Public Library, The Carousel Center, Mahoning Shenango Valley Historical Club. KSU-Trumbull, Beulah Baptist Church


Comments

1Ianacek(909 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

As a white , I feel sick when I see comments like db2's . There are plenty of instances of blacks in the Valley being discrimated against . I will bet db2 wouldn't hire a black for a responsible job & wouldn'rt be friendly if a black family moved next door . I've been to Poland & its a nice place , but could someone explain to me why there are only 7 blacks living there out of a population of 2800 ? Perhaps it is because most blacks don't earn enough to afford Poland properties . Even if they do earn enough , do they feel welcome ? I commend John Howard's book "Black Like Me' .
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Li...

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2lumberjack(1 comment)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

what about "white" history month. oh, that is right that would be racist. how about all the blacks that cry about slavery, discrimination, repression and in general live on self pity, get off your self serving lazy butt and prevail. mr. william cosby, who was REALLY POOR, never complains about any of the above. why, he succeeded, overcame, triumphed!!

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3lee(544 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

People might not get all they work for in this world, but they must certainly work for all they get.
Frederick Douglass

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4lee(544 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

I am a Republican, a black, dyed in the wool Republican, and I never intend to belong to any other party than the party of freedom and progress.
Frederick Douglass

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5Stan(9923 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

Studying Black History is good but why not make Black History by focusing on a work ethic geared toward prosperity and two parent families showing their children the right way in life ? Yes, it can be done and many Blacks in The Valley have paved the way .

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6Wapiti(139 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

It's past time that black history month was changed to black history day. By having a month devoted to race that is no longer a minority is truly a racist act. Why not have an American Indian MONTH at YSU? Heck, American Indians can't even get ONE DAY at YSU. How about a Hungarian Month? Maybe an Irish MONTH. Or maybe a Welsh MONTH.
Please stop cramming this so called minority down our throats. They no longer deserve nor need a month as they're no longer a minority. Give the month to a true minority. Are you listening YSU?

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71FedUp1(2 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

Couldn't have said it better myself db2! Right on!!!

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8WarrenRicheyKid(167 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

Black History IS American History. And it is very important. The original wealth of this country came from the export of high value cash crops --cotton, sugar, coffee, and tobacco, all products of Black slave labor. A hundred years after the end of slavery, African Americans in the South still could not vote. When my grandparents arrived in Youngstown from Italy, Blacks were lynched and continued to be through my generation's time. I once worked in a large all white machine shop in Youngstown, where the owner was completely free to deny employment on the basis of color. And he did...until federal civil rights law stopped him. American History is important. African Americans have a unique story, often untold, that's part of our greater history. Let's all of us learn it.

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9Lifes2Short(3877 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

lanachek

"Perhaps it is because most blacks don't earn enough to afford Poland properties ."

And why is that? School- They have every opportunity to get a education being a minority. Work - Have to pass a drug test - background check like everyone else. Values - can't put drug dealing, robbing, stealing, murdering on a resume.

A hard working decent black can get a good job, move where every he wants, they have the means but don't have the desire to better themselves. And for that, you feel bad about it?

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10Ret(39 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

As long as Black history month does not cost me a dime in tax dollars, I really don't give a hoot how long some wants to celebrate their heritage. From what I can see these events that are listed, most of them are happening after hours and are not interfering with school or work hours.
I think that most people who celebrate Black history month do so as a family, and like anybody pride in your past makes you a better person. I really don't think the thugs hanging out celebrate anything except themselves.

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11captainpeewee(66 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

I am with db2 all the way, tired of the big black lie if the whites didn,t buy the slaves from the ivery cost they would have been killed , by there own people during the tribal wars,

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12MrBill(43 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

African Movie Night really stands out. Women in Zambia learning to make movies, give me a break, they would be better served being taught to skin a condom on a banana, then no one would be concerned about an AID'S epidemic....

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13captainpeewee(66 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

wright on mr Bill, they should have a class in the youngstown ,

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14cambridge(3013 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

Captain....Is peewee your mental capacity or a description of part of your anatomy?

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15gmafb(3 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

Wend I hear comments like the ones by db2 and lumberjerk,makes me wonder why they are so bitter,I be the first to admit theres a problem here in Youngstown with crime and drugs but what they fail to realize is that comments like don't hurt the 10% of thug they talk about it hurts the good people who live there, maybe db2 and lumberjerk should check the census and they will see that 130,000 of the people in Youngstown are white, 34.000 are black and 5.000 are Hispanic so you tell me who there stupid comments hurt the most.and by the way I'am not black.

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161970mach1(1005 comments)posted 3 years, 7 months ago

"Odd; I cannot think of one murder of blacks by whites here in Ytown last year. "
_________________________________

Actually, a black real estate agent was killed and the two suspects are white trash.
And don't forget the 6 black people who were burned to death in their home by the white trash punk, and he didn't even get the death penalty.

Local media did not play the race angle on those cases thankfully. Unfortunately, national media goes bezerk when they get a hold of white on black murders, as rare as they are.

Personally, I hate all murderers regardless of the race of their victim(s).

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