facebooktwitterRSS
- Advertisement -
  • Most Commentedmost commented up
  • Most Emailedmost emailed up
  • Popularmost popular up
- Advertisement -
 

« News Home

Dozens voice plea to spare Youngstown postal facility



Published: Thu, December 29, 2011 @ 12:10 a.m.

By Elise Franco

Efranco@vindy.com

Boardman

Closing the Youngstown mail-processing and distribution center would be catastrophic for the city, said dozens who attended a public meeting on the matter.

Those people, including Mahoning Valley residents, local politicians and postal service employees, voiced those concerns Wednesday evening at a public meeting at Boardman High School’s Performing Arts Center.

Postal officials said no final decision on the closure has been made, and it will continue to accept comments until Jan. 12.

The meeting drew several hundred who oppose the loss of the Youngstown center.

Retired postal worker Ellis Williams said he thinks the postal service should be working to expand and better serve, rather than cut.

“Our country is in shambles, and the postal service is proposing to escalate the damage,” he said. “Taking the mail out of Youngstown will devastate this city. ... Pittsburgh is more able to absorb the loss of employment.”

David Betras, Mahoning County Democratic Party chairman, asked Todd Hawkins, the U.S. Postal Service’s northern Ohio district manager, to explain why Youngstown’s center would close when the city’s economy would take a much greater hit than Pittsburgh’s.

“We have suffered here for 30 years with job loss, so take that into account,” he said. “Why can’t you do [the merging] here?”

The postal service previously had selected the Youngstown facility, along with 251 others nationwide, to close as part of a restructuring effort.

The Youngstown center, home to about 500 employees, could have closed as early as March, but pressure from Congress prompted a moratorium on post-office terminations, Dominic Corso, president of American Postal Workers’ Union Local 443 has said.

State Sen. Joe Schiavoni of Canfield, D-33rd, said he came to Wednesday’s meeting to hear the postal service’s reasoning behind the proposed closure.

“I’m concerned with job loss and the loss in service quality that people here would experience,” he said. “Some changes need to be made, but I hope some presence will remain here in Youngstown.”

The postal service already has said that first-class mail will soon take two to three days to deliver, not the standard one-day delivery.

Hawkins cited declining mail delivery as the main reason for the closing. Though the postal service still delivers more than 167 billion pieces of mail annually, that represents a 20 percent decline from 2006, he said.

Public comments are being accepted through Jan. 12 on the proposed closing of the Youngstown mail-processing and distribution center.

Hawkins said the Area Mail Processing study that has recommended merging the Youngstown facility with one in Pittsburgh will not be complete for about three months.

Meanwhile, area residents can mail their comments to complete. Management, Consumer and Industry Contact, Northern Ohio District, 2400 Orange Ave. Room 25, Cleveland 44101.

Hawkins outlined other reasons that the AMP study recommended maintaining the Pittsburgh facility over Youngstown’s.

He said the Pittsburgh facility is larger and better equipped to handle an influx of mail volume from Youngstown, as well as other facilities that may shut down as a result of the downsizing.

“When the criteria for the study is set it goes through different elements — the ability of the equipment, ability to handle volume of mail, facility size,” he said. “It’s about where it’s best for us. ... It’s based on data.”

“We can’t afford to keep all the machines running and run our trucks across the country,” he said. “With this proposal we expect an annual savings of more than $7.7 million.”


Comments

1dant3et(3 comments)posted 2 years, 3 months ago

The United States and Somalia are the only two countries that do not support a postal service.

The United States made the U.S. Postal Service self sufficient during the Reagan administration.

The employees of the U.S. Postal Service competed for their jobs, through testing and screening, to provide an educated and hardworking, work force, that provides secure paper communications, and many other services.

The United States Government has been taking billions of dollars off the U.S. Postal service over the years, including the 5.5 billion dollars a year since 2006, that has forced the U.S. Postal Service to near bankruptcy. Both Postal management and Postal Unions have pleaded with Congress not to do this, and now, to return this money that went into the general treasury, under the guise of medical benefits for the retired Postal employees, for seventy five years in the future. No other Federal agency, and no other business is required to do this!

The U.S. Postal Service has overpaid billions of dollars since 1970, to our government, who refuses to support the most efficient universal mailing system in the world. Instead our own government is forcing the Postal service to destroy the network that can handle billions of items yearly to every address in this huge country of ours for the same low (compared to other countries) price, in a timely manner.

Only Congress can change the forced demise of universal service to the citizens and businesses of this country.

Suggest removal:

2stewie(108 comments)posted 2 years, 3 months ago

dant3et, You are absolutely right! Another example of congress hoodwinking the American people again!

Suggest removal:

3southsidedave(4709 comments)posted 2 years, 3 months ago

Unfortunately, the U.S. Postal Service has reached the end of its useful life and cannot profitably compete in the global economy.

Suggest removal:

4topsailwatch(60 comments)posted 2 years, 3 months ago

ONCE AGAIN THE UNIONS HAVE SCREWED UP ANOTHER SECTOR OF SOCIETY.

POSTAL WORKERS ARE INDEED NECESSARY, BUT THEY ARE WAY OVERPAID FOR THE JOB THAT THEY DO. IT DOESN'T TAKE A ROCKET SCIENTIST TO DELIVER MAIL AND THERE ARE MANY PEOPLE WAITING IN LINE TO DO THAT JOB AT HALF THE PRICE.

NO, I WOULDN'T WANT THEIR JOBS.....SNOW, WIND, RAIN,SUN, DOGS ETC., BUT THEY ARE STILL OVER PAID AND THEIR UNIONS WENT TOO FAR TO GET THEM MORE MONEY, MORE PERKS, MORE OVERTIME.

THEY KILLED THE GOOSE THAT LAID THE GOLDEN EGG.......SO NOW THEY WILL HAVE TO LIVE WITH IT !!

SORRY FOLKS, BUT THAT IS ECONOMICS 101.

Suggest removal:

5MOLOCH(21 comments)posted 2 years, 3 months ago

Since sb5 didn't pass they had to find another way to cut costs - I bet more people loose their jobs to downsizing because it didn't pass. Fireman & policemen included.

Suggest removal:

6bearadvisor(2 comments)posted 2 years, 3 months ago

I do not believe that the postal service has reached the end of its useful life. That it needs to adapt to the realities of today, is apparent, but sadly, the adaptions will be subject to the emotions of a 'me' world, not a business climate as it should be. Is mail delivery to your home or business on Saturday really necessary? Are small local post offices, some located within only a couple of miles of one another, too important to a community to be closed? Consolidating regional sorting centers as discussed in this article will have an impact on what we are 'used' to getting in service, but it would still be 'good' service, even if it took a day longer for the mail to arrive. I used to live in a community where there was no local delivery, we had to go to the post office to get our mail and to mail things out. Talk about an inconvenience! But that same community, and several in the surrounding area with similar situations, would fight hard about the 'need' for the local office. They would also complain about the cost of postage!

Suggest removal:

7tmarie(5 comments)posted 2 years, 3 months ago

Here's the situation for those who keep blaming the internet and email. THIS IS WHAT'S KILLING THE POST OFFICE, for the 2nd time today:
A congressional mandate is killing the U.S. Postal Service.
A 2006 postal reform law requires the USPS to pre-fund 75 years' worth of future retiree health benefits within just 10 years. At the behest of the Office of Personnel Management and the Government Accountability Office, and to make the law appear not to cost the government money (i.e., to be “revenue neutral”), Congress included in the law that destructive pre-funding mandate.
No other federal agency or private enterprise is forced to pre-fund similar benefits like this, especially on such an aggressive schedule.
This postal-only mandate costs the USPS $5.5 billion per year. It accounts for 100 percent of the Postal Service’s $20 billion in losses over the past four years.
It also accounts for 100 percent of the rise in the Postal Service’s debt in recent years.
Without the mandate, the USPS would have been profitable over the past four years, and rather than having to use up its $15 billion line of credit from the U.S. Treasury to cover the pre-funding obligation, the Postal Service would have had significant borrowing authority to ride out the bad economy it now faces.
The $47 billion the Postal Service has deposited so far into its retiree health fund over the past four years instead could have been spent on operating costs.
The Postal Service and its employees don’t want a taxpayer bailout. We have not received any taxpayer funds in nearly 30 years.
What we do want is the freedom to use our own surplus pension funds to pay down the pre-funding obligation.
But this can only happen if Congress changes the current law.
Please learn the facts before posting the "There's nothing we can do about it" comments. Stand up and fight!!!

Suggest removal:

8tmarie(5 comments)posted 2 years, 3 months ago

TO ANYONE WHO THINKS THAT POSTAL WORKERS ARE OVERPAID, GO DO THEIR JOB FOR 8+ HOURS, EITHER AT THE COUNTER, DEALING WITH ALL WALKS OF LIFE, OR CARRY THE MAIL IN THE WORST POSSIBLE WEATHER, FOR MORE THAN A FEW DAYS IN A ROW. EVERY ONE OF THOSE WORKERS HAS EARNED THEIR PAY, AND BENEFITS. PAY ATTENTION, NEXT TIME YOU'RE IN LINE AT THE POST OFFICE, AND WATCH WHAT HELL THEY TAKE DAY IN AND DAY OUT.

Suggest removal:

9captdinger(108 comments)posted 2 years, 3 months ago

"tmarie", that's a bunch of crap. There are millions of people that work in those conditions for much less. They can always quit if they can't handle it. They need to go to 5 day delivery, cut pay accordingly. IE, eliminate 1 day's pay, close or combine a lot of those cushie little post offices around the country to start.

Suggest removal:

10Klink(36 comments)posted 2 years, 3 months ago

The postal haters are a weird bunch. I know at work and I’m sure many more businesses depend on the post office. It has been very efficient for my lifetime in the past and up to this day. It is a depended upon service that helps the commerce of this country. I have spoken to many postal workers and their wages are fair for what they do. For some odd reason, there are people that think that what is a very needed service done efficiently should not receive much more than minimal wages.

Suggest removal:

11tmarie(5 comments)posted 2 years, 3 months ago

REALLY CAPTDINGER???? YOU GO DO IT, THEN, AND TELL ME ABOUT IT! AS FOR OTHERS WHO DO AND MAKE LESS, I'LL ASK YOU, HAVE YOU HEARD OF THE OCCUPY WALL STREET MOVEMENT? PART OF THE PROTEST IS THAT FOLKS AREN'T GETTING PAID WHAT THEY ARE WORTH. DO YOUR HOMEWORK!!!

Suggest removal:


News
Opinion
Entertainment
Sports
Marketplace
Classifieds
Records
Discussions
Community
Help
Forms
Neighbors

HomeTerms of UsePrivacy StatementAdvertiseStaff DirectoryHelp
© 2014 Vindy.com. All rights reserved. A service of The Vindicator.
107 Vindicator Square. Youngstown, OH 44503

Phone Main: 330.747.1471 • Interactive Advertising: 330.740.2955 • Classified Advertising: 330.746.6565
Sponsored Links: Vindy Wheels | Vindy Jobs | Vindy Homes | Pittsburgh International Airport