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Union supporters in Ohio rally invoke MLK memory



Published: Mon, April 4, 2011 @ 4:00 p.m.

CLEVELAND (AP) — About 300 union supporters chanted “we are one” and denounced Gov. John Kasich at a rally that linked the fight for public employee collective bargaining rights to the memory of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Unions across Ohio are had rallies to mark today’s 43rd anniversary of King’s assassination in Memphis, Tenn., where he was backing a strike by sanitation workers. At a rally in downtown Cleveland, workers vowed to block the bill Kasich signed last week that bans public worker strikes, eliminates binding arbitration and restricts bargaining for 350,000 public employees.

Democratic U.S. Rep. Betty Sutton said Republicans are trying to silence workers at the bargaining table.

The event was part of a coast-to-coast effort to link union representation to King’s message of equality.


Comments

1db(280 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

I didn't know that MLK spoke out for welfare.

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2Freeatlast(1991 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

It sure will not be the KKK TEA GOV.

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3TylerDurden(367 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

Unions stand for equality but aggressively denounce anyone or thing that is non-union?

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4Stan(9923 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

In the battle for their share of the pie they want the whole pie . The idea of public servants is being scrapped . Now they want to take control and the masses to be their oyster ready for a shucking !

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5cambridge(3013 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

TylerDurden....People post comments on this site all day long ripping union workers. I don't recall even one comment by any union member ripping anyone for choosing not to belong to a union.

This is a free country and people are allowed to belong to a union if they want or they can be non union if they wish, it's no ones business but their own.

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6ytown1(392 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

It is my business if I choose to buy a non union automobile, but when it comes to my taxes I have no choice whether I can choose Union or non union Cambridge so we need SB5 to correct the madness that we find ourselves in.

I also am not ripping the unions, these are the facts, Jack. Get over it. That is my definition of a free country, what is yours?

Oh yours is to manipulate the electorate to hand out ridiculous benefits as payback for supporting them at election time? Doesn't sound like my free country.

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7Attis(879 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

Exactly 43 years ago yesterday MLK denounced workplace injustice. Exactly 44 years ago today MLK denounced the war in Vietnam. Now, with SB 5 in Ohio and three simultaneous Vietnam-like wars, the prophetic message of MLK is needed (and heeded) more than ever. We shall overcome.

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8Capybara91(11 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

Corporations will shortly become our elected officials. Then government functions will be outsourced to China and India. You won't get any services. You won't even understand what they're saying. But they're so polite over there that you won't feel so bad.

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9TylerDurden(367 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

If you truly believe people have an option to join or forego a union in some industries, then you are flat out wrong.

Auto
Steel
Janitorial
Teachers

Just a few. What happens to those who do not join in those particular industries?

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10ytown1(392 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

So you tell me you do not have a choice at these jobs?

Auto
Steel
Janitorial
Teachers

Sounds like forced servitude (Slavery) to me TylerDurden? How about you?

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11TylerDurden(367 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

Your missing the point. If someone takes a position in one of those industries they are "strongly encouraged" to join the union. I would say that those jobs will remain in demand for the foreseeable future and have many citizens taking positions within them. Nothing is forced until you enter that particular industry.
Of course you can choose another industry.

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12UnionForever(1470 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

The race card has nothing to do with SB5. The greedy public union employees and their Democratic supports will stop at nothing to defeat SB5. Well it isn't going to happen. The vast majority of taxpayers are not going to believe them. The truth is it saves taxpayers $1.191B a year that they won't have to pay in increased taxes while leveling the pay and benefit field for public vs private employees. If it even makes it to a vote, SB5 will be sustained.

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13Stan(9923 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

"About 300 union supporters chanted “we are one”

Let's raise the taxes and give them all raises ! It's the masses who pay taxes who will fund the largesse .

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14cambridge(3013 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

I would like to post a serious question and invite anyone to answer it.

I don't know if these assumptions are correct or not and that is why I'm asking.

It is my understanding that when a person that works as a public employee retires and they take their public employees pension they opt out of social security.

If that is true that means that every public employee that has ever worked a private sector job has had SS tax taken from their paycheck. I'm going to assume that this scenario would apply to almost every public worker. That would mean that those social security taxes they paid go to the rest of us. If that is the case I'd like to thank the public employees for helping out the private sector even though that part of the equation seems to go unnoticed.

One more thing, Those public employees pay taxes so they participate in funding their own wages and benefits at a much higher rate than people in the private sector do.

If my understanding of the situation is not correct I would welcome anyone who can explain it correctly. Thanks.

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15JME(801 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

To honestly answer your question, the public employees will receive a social security benefit if they worked in the private sector, even if it was part-time or a small percentage of their lifetime earnings. Just like the private sector, the Social Security benefit is based on how much they put into it as a private sector employee. They don't receive Social Security for a public sector job because they don't pay into it.

I also have a serious question: How is the public employees tax rate higher than private sector employees? Aren't the tax rates based on how much you make. Also, they're getting some of their taxes back in the form of wage/benefits.

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16cambridge(3013 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

I didn't say the public employee is taxed at a higher rate I'm saying they contribute more money through their taxes to fund their own wages and benefits.

If a public employee is in a 25% tax bracket they are paying 25% of their earnings back to their employer.

A private sector employee even if they chip in for their pension and/or health benefits where they work it will not be any where near 25%.

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17Guin96(40 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

If you take a public retirment, you only get social security if you worked enough quarters to qualify for a benefit. But then it is drastically reduced to offset your pension. If you worked in the private sector and paid into social security but didn't work enough quarters to qualify, you won't be able to collect any social security at all.

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18cambridge(3013 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

I just checked the government web site and it states that a person needs 40 credits (quarters) to qualify for social security retirement.

That's ten years of credits. So if a public employee at the time of retirement worked 9 years and 3 quarters in the private sector all that money they paid into SS goes to the rest of us and they get none of it.

So again I will say to the public employee, thanks for you contribution and thanks for not complaining about it. Keep up the fight.

http://www.ssa.gov/glossary.htm

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19JME(801 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

"higher rate I'm saying they contribute more money through their taxes to fund their own wages and benefits.
If a public employee is in a 25% tax bracket they are paying 25% of their earnings back to their employer.
A private sector employee even if they chip in for their pension and/or health benefits where they work it will not be any where near 25%."

Not including pension or other non-wage benefits, how are those two any different if they each are in the 25% tax bracket? They are both kicking in the same tax %, both to the public sectors employer. In fact, the public sector employee will be seeing some of their tax money returned to their pockets via pension.

For arguments sake, lets say both public employee and private employee make the same wage and are in the same tax bracket. In other words, they pay the same amount of imcome tax. The difference is:

Public sector employee kicks in 10% towards pension, with the State kicking in 14%.

The private sector employee is paying into Social Security, and more than likely a 401K and/or IRA - and it's probably safe to say there is not a private sector employer that is kicking in another 14% on top of the employees contribution. (And we all know that many of us are not likely to see much from Social Sercurity when retirement comes, but that's another debate).

Obviously we would need specific numbers or scenario, but it appears that the private sector employee would have to kick in allot more towards retirement than the public sector employee - to achieve the same retirement benefit.

Regarding the public sector employee working in the private sector. My wife receives the yearly report estimating what she'll receive in Social Security benefits. As I've said before, she is a teacher but did work summers and some other times in the private sector. So, she must have worked enough in the private sector to receive Social Security benenfits on top of her pension.

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20JME(801 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

" Most people need 40 credits to qualify for benefits."

The wording is MOST people.

Can you reference where the rule is regarding public sector employees who have worked in the private sector?

"Not all employees work in jobs covered by Social Security. Some of these employees are—

•Employees of some state and local governments that chose not to participate in Social Security; or .."

It would appear the public sector employees also made a CHOICE. And the pension is the better choice.

http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/10072.html#not

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21ytown1(392 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

@cambridge,
"I just checked the government web site and it states that a person needs 40 credits (quarters) to qualify for social security retirement.

That's ten years of credits. So if a public employee at the time of retirement worked 9 years and 3 quarters in the private sector all that money they paid into SS goes to the rest of us and they get none of it."

Hate to break the bad news to you cambridge, but that rule would apply to all, Public or Private would both forfeit SS benefit if all they contributed into the it was for 9 years and 3 months.

No special rules when it applies as you stated, so a thank you would go out to both.

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22JME(801 comments)posted 3 years, 5 months ago

"In 2011, you receive one credit for each $1,120 of earnings, up to the maximum of four credits per year."

So, you only need to make $4,480 per year to receive the 4 credits.

Working 9 years 3 quarters would result in earnings of $43,680.

What % of that would go to Social Security? Probably not a whole lot - That would be the amount potentially lossed by a public sector employee.

Getting 14% added to your pension courtesy of the tax-payer makes that up pretty damn quick.

A big thank you private sector tax-payers for providing such a very generous benefit for the public sector employees. (since their taxes get returned to them through wage/benefits)

Now a question, regarding public sector employees, what is the average number a years these people spent working in the private sector? I highly doubt it's anywhere close to 9 years 3 quarters.

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